Alaska Film Archives

Alaska Review 57
Alaska Review 57
Alaska Review examines development of the agricultural industry in the Matanuska Valley and Delta areas of Alaska, and it reports on financial problems faced by Alaska's farmers. Topics discussed include the 1979 Delta barley project, the Seward grain terminal, the Point Mackenzie dairy industry, Matanuska Maid bankruptcy concerns, and competition from products imported into Alaska. Those interviewed include unidentified farmers; Walter Parker, former commissioner of the Alaska Department of Transportation; Alaska Governor Jay Hammond; Bob Palmer, former state senator and Kenai Peninsula farmer; Alaska State Senator Vic Fisher; Jerry Bremer?, Delta farmer; Charlie Trowbridge?, Delta farmer; Barney Hollembaek, Delta farmer; Bill Heim, director of Alaska's Division of Agriculture; David Smith, assistant manager of Matanuska Maid; Karen Lee of Dairy West at Point Mackenzie; and Pete Probasco, manager of the Alaska Revolving Loan Fund. The program contains views of Matanuska Valley farms, historical photos and films of early farming in Alaska, grocery stores, shipping containers and imported products at sea ports, Delta area farming operations, livestock, dairy cattle, Matanuska Maid milk processing facilities, an ARLF (Agricultural Revolving Loan Fund) board meeting, and egg processing facilities.
Alaska Review 58
Alaska Review 58
Alaska Review examines the rapid growth of Alaska's pollock and bottom-fishing industry and what it means for the state's economy. The report covers topics such as the Magnuson Act, the 200-Mile Limit, joint venture operations, foreign fishing fleets, harvest limits, and new food products such as surimi. Those interviewed include: Thorn (or Thorne?) Tasker of Alaskan Joint Venture Fisheries, Inc.; Al Burch of the Alaska Draggers Association; Chris Riley of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Jim Branson of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council; Greg Baker (?), director of the Office of Commercial Fisheries Development for the State of Alaska; Bob Keating, Joint Venture representative; Colonel Yong Sam Kim of the Samho Moolsan Company of South Korea; Chris Mitchell (?), executive director of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Jerry Babbitt, food scientist with the National Marine Fisheries Service; and Gilbert Francklyn, Dutch Harbor crab fisherman. The program contains views of the Alaska coastline, fishing vessels, the visit of an Alaskan commission to Norway, fish processing facilities, grocery store fish displays, fish preparation at a restaurant, underwater scenes of fish being caught in a bottom trawling net, nets being hauled back aboard boats, graph showing bottom fish harvest levels, scenes from the 1984 North Pacific Fisheries Management Council meeting, a Japanese restaurant, an Alaska Pacific Seafoods processing facility in Kodiak, a food science lab, crab pots and crab boats, and a graph showing a rapid decline in Bering Sea king crab harvest levels.
Alaska Review 59
Alaska Review 59
Alaska Review and Focus North examine the Alaska Native Review Commission, headed by Thomas Berger of Canada, which performed an independent review of the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act on behalf of Native groups in Alaska. The program also touches upon Canada's Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry of the mid 1970s, which investigated the possible impacts of a proposed gas pipeline through Canada's Yukon and Northwest Territories. Those interviewed include: Justice Thomas Berger; Frank T'Seleie, former chief of Good Hope, Northwest Territories; Bob Blair, president of Foothills Pipeline, Ltd.; Alaska Governor Bill Sheffield; David Case, author; Willie Hensley, Alaska Native leader; Mary Malchoff of Port Graham; Elenore McMullen of Port Graham; Lydia Robart of Port Graham; and others. The program contains views of villages in Canada and Alaska, community hearings in Canada and Alaska, an Inuit Circumpolar Conference (ICC) meeting, Anchorage streets, subsistence and trapping activities, and Native dancing and cultural activities.
Alaska Review 60
Alaska Review 60
Alaska Review examines efforts by American fishermen and processors to control and market Alaska's bottom fish. Those interviewed include Jim Branson, executive director of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council; Thorne Tasker of Alaskan Joint Venture Fisheries; David Harville with the Kodiak and Western Trawler Group; Rick Lauber of the Pacific Seafood Processors Association; Chris Mitchell of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Taekuk Chung of Transocean Enterprises of South Korea; and U.S. Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska. The program contains views of commercial fishing activities, foreign and domestic fishing boats and fleets, U.S. Coast Guard vessels, a graph depicting fish harvest levels, and fish processing facilities.
Alaska Review 61
Alaska Review 61
Alaska Review examines problems associated with intensive use of the Kenai River in Alaska and the conflict between commercial and sport fishermen. Topics discussed include loss of salmon habitat, erosion along the river bank, and disturbances caused by boat wakes. Those interviewed include: Paul Ruesch, fisheries biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Bob Penny, chairman of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Bix Bonney, member of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Jim Evenson, commercial fisherman; Melvin Johnson, commercial fisherman; Stan Thompson, Kenai Peninsula Borough mayor; Harry Gaines, fishing guide; Christopher Estes of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Bill Long, hydrologist with the Alaska Department of Natural Resources; Neil Johannsen, director of Parks for the Alaska Department of Natural Resources; Jeff Jefferson, president of the Kenai River Advisory Board; Sharon Jean (?) of the Kenai River Advisory Board; and Alaska Governor Bill Sheffield. The program includes views of fishermen in small boats and standing on the banks of the Kenai River, people posing with salmon, recreational vehicles along a river, combat fishing, fish traps in use during Alaska's territorial days, fish netting, an annual meeting of the Board of Fisheries, sonar fish counter, biologists tagging salmon, fish processing facilities, protestors, Cook Inlet, and cabins along the river.
Alaska Review 62
Alaska Review 62
Alaska Review examines problems associated with the growth of Alaska's prison population. Topics of discussion include prison overcrowding, the Cleary v. Smith case, treatment programs for sex-offenders, rehabilitation programs for prisoners, presumptive sentencing, and the possible need for more prisons to be constructed. Those interviewed include: Roger Endell, commissioner of the Department of Corrections; State Representative Don Clocksin of Anchorage; Dr. Allan Barnes of the School of Justice at the University of Alaska in Anchorage; Avrum Gross, former State Attorney General; Nick Maroules, research director for the Alaska Judicial Council; Judge Victor Carlson of the Alaska Superior Court in Anchorage; Timothy Sterns (?), attorney who argued on behalf of inmates in the Cleary v. Smith case; Larry Robbins (?), compliance officer at Cook Inlet Corrections Facility in Anchorage; Susan Humphrey Barnett, director of Statewide Programs; State Senator Pat Rodey of Anchorage; State Representative Fritz Pettyjohn of Anchorage; and the Reverend Alonzo Patterson, chairman of the Alaska Parole Board. The program contains views of Alaskan prison facilities, the Lemon Creek Correctional Center, a graph depicting the growth of the statewide inmate population, court proceedings, the Third Avenue Jail in Anchorage, and the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center in Eagle River.
Alaska Review 63
Alaska Review 63
Alaska Review examines the growth and future of Alaska's largest city, Anchorage. The history of the development of the city is discussed, as are present-day problems such as poor transportation corridors and an outdated land-use system. Those interviewed include: Mike Carberry, senior planner for the Municipality of Anchorage; Bob Atwood, publisher of the Anchorage Daily Times; George Sullivan, former mayor of the Municipality of Anchorage; Walt Parker, former member of the Anchorage Assembly; Bill Laria? municipal planning director; Greg Jones, Anchorage planning commissioner; Barry Quinn?, director of capital projects for the Municipality of Anchorage; Tony Knowles, Anchorage mayor; and Scott Hawkins, economist. The program contains many views of historical photos, film clips and maps, and present-day scenes of Anchorage.
[Alaska sheep and bear]
[Alaska sheep and bear]
This footage shows Dall sheep in the hills (focus is soft) and a bear near a river.
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 2]
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 2]
This film is made up of several smaller reels labeled "Salcha and Texas 1973," "Healy, Salcha, Chena, Gulk [?], Tex," "Healy Lake," "Healy Coal, Home," "Healy Lake, Home Fbks, Xmas, Old Shop," "Healy Lake, Rich, Snow Mach, Ski Boot Hill," and "Ski Boot Hill, Downtown." The film contains footage of an Alaska cabin and tracked cart, a neighborhood and Baptist church, a family fishing, canoeing on a lake, a family at home, a school bus in Healy during winter with a group posing near the bus, a cabin and hunting scenes, Christmas and home scenes, men in a shop, a large building in winter, camping scenes, snowmachines, a highway, skiing, a ski hill tow rope, and downtown Fairbanks.
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 3]
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 3]
This film is made up of several smaller reels labeled "Valdez 1973, To Whittier, Col Glacier," "Valdez 1973, O.B., John and Ruth, Party in Garage, Duck Camp 1973," "Healy Lake and Summit River, To Valdez," "Gulkana, Salcha," "Gulkana, Dawn and Vic [?]," "Gulkana," and "1969 Gulkana." The film contains views of the Columbia Glacier, a family traveling in Alaska to Valdez, people gathering and sitting at tables, people fishing and cleaning fish, boating on a river, a man and a dog sleeping, the interior of a cabin, a man washing and cooking inside a cabin, a baseball game, a woman and a boat, family and river scenes, a family fishing, and camping scenes.
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 5]
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 5]
This film is made up of several smaller film reels labeled "Yellowstone 1969," "Yellowstone," "Mexico 1969," "Acapulco," "Port Vallarta," "Rodeo 1970," "Rodeo Fair," and "Hoover Dam 1976 [?] Park [?]." The film contains scenes of travel outside Alaska, travel scenes that may or may not have been filmed in Alaska, and unusual rodeo scenes featuring circus animals.
[Alaska traveling I circa 1926, railroad, ships, coastal communities]
[Alaska traveling I circa 1926, railroad, ships, coastal communities]
This film is labeled “Alaska 1925,” “Alaska 1925 - I think – travelling,” and “Alaska 1926 I.” The footage contains scenes of people traveling in an open train car, a conductor talking to people aboard a train, railroad travel, travel by ship, coastal communities, military ships in a harbor (possibly Seattle), automobiles and people in a town with a mountainous backdrop, a totem pole, a town with muddy streets, a sign for a Valdez dock, a ship at a dock, a boy with a fish, men unloading boxes on a dock, an Emel Packing Company sign, a cannery, an Alaska Steamship Company sign on a vessel, further scenes of shipboard and dock activities in Valdez, and ship passengers enjoying the scenery.
[Alaska traveling II circa 1926, Fairbanks and Cordova]
[Alaska traveling II circa 1926, Fairbanks and Cordova]
This film is labeled, “Alaska 1925 or 1927” and “Alaska Travelling II 1926.” Footage contains scenes of people aboard a large ship, the S.S. Alaska, viewing a glacier. It also features a train crossing a tall railroad trestle and winding through mountainous terrain, the train going under a trestle and through a tunnel, scenes of the railroad bridge in Nenana, First Avenue in Fairbanks, the sternwheeler Alice and another vessel, the Cowles Street library building and a nearby home in downtown Fairbanks, men and women at the University of Alaska farm in Fairbanks, a child with a haltered cow, a goat, other livestock, a man panning for gold, mining activities including a sluice box and windlass, men and women pushing an automobile, people on a street (likely in Fairbanks), a train in Cordova, men unloading sacks onto a dock, and people aboard a ship viewing the surrounding water and mountains.
[Alaska traveling II circa 1926, Fairbanks and Cordova]
[Alaska traveling II circa 1926, Fairbanks and Cordova]
This film is labeled, “Alaska 1925 or 1927” and “Alaska Travelling II 1926.” Footage contains scenes of people aboard a large ship, the S.S. Alaska, viewing a glacier. It also features a train crossing a tall railroad trestle and winding through mountainous terrain, the train going under a trestle and through a tunnel, scenes of the railroad bridge in Nenana, First Avenue in Fairbanks, the sternwheeler Alice and another vessel, the Cowles Street library building and a nearby home in downtown Fairbanks, men and women at the University of Alaska farm in Fairbanks, a child with a haltered cow, a goat, other livestock, a man panning for gold, mining activities including a sluice box and windlass, men and women pushing an automobile, people on a street (likely in Fairbanks), a train in Cordova, men unloading sacks onto a dock, and people aboard a ship viewing the surrounding water and mountains.
[Alaska Visitors Association film]
[Alaska Visitors Association film]
This 35mm film from the Alaska Visitors Association shows eagles, whales, rivers, sled dog teams, aerial views, mountains, seals, hills, forests, moose, sheep, caribou, geese, rivers, ducks, bears, a cruise ship, fish, Prince William Sound, totem poles, a blanket toss, Alaska Native peoples, recreational activities, and waterfalls. A narrator encourages people to visit Alaska following the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill.
Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3
Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3
Images include the title screen "Educational Films Corporation America Presents Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3 Produced by Al.I.Smith." This film's scenes feature early Anchorage, Alaska Railroad construction, Childs Glacier calving, and men hunting Kodiak bears. It also includes scenes of Anchorage streets and log structures, the Alaska Labor Union building, a laundry tent, Fourth of July celebrations featuring an eating contest, a baseball game, and Anchorage area bungalows.
[Alaskans]
[Alaskans]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme has AAF-20081 numbered as Bacon 18-03 and titled “People - Alaskans.” Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about the group of films that includes this film is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: “Stan Price at his home - He is an old-timer who lived on Saxman Island - There were these bears and he knew them and he could walk around and they never bothered him because he knew them - He had a garden there - There is his obituary in the box - Riverboat in Nenana - It was put in down river from the bridge - They wanted to bring the riverboat up to Fairbanks so they had to wait until high water to get the boat up to Chena but it could not fit under the bridge - There was a big pole in the way so they had to take a big saw and cut enough of the pole to make it under the bridge - Homesteader Paul Elbert’s new D9 cat. He is cleaning his farmland outside of Fairbanks in a place called ‘Happy Valley.’” Notes on the film box are as follows: “Stan Price at his home with the bears, Rusty Heurlin at his log home in Ester June 1974, break-up 1961, Riverboat Nenana under the bridge in Nenana, coming up the Chena River tying up in Fairbanks, Obituary of Stanton Price” and “Reel 3: People – Alaskans.”
[ALCAN Highway construction]
[ALCAN Highway construction]
This footage was filmed by John R. Swanson during the time that he worked on construction of the Alaska Highway. Scenes include a sign for the Robert Lowe Bridge across Miles Canyon near Whitehorse, river rapids, a small boat on a river or lake, a muddy roadbed, cars traveling on a muddy road, a tracked vehicle, a campsite, road construction activities, views of the road from a ridge top, a dump truck and steam shovel at work, autumn colors, men walking on the road, a man driving, vehicles on the road, men wearing orange or red hats, men at a camp, and a row of canvas tents.
[Alyeska pipeline start-up raw footage from 1977]
[Alyeska pipeline start-up raw footage from 1977]
Footage includes reporter Ted Lehne speaking about the start-up of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, scenes of the pipeline in various locations, Yukon River Bridge, Ted Lehne interviewing Dr. Darch about the start-up of the pipeline and refinery construction in North Pole as well as about a possible gas pipeline (sound), views of the pipeline and pump stations, and a pipeline pig.
[Alyeska start-up]
[Alyeska start-up]
Images include the press and TV crews at Prudhoe Bay waiting for oil to start flowing into the Trans-Alaska Pipeline on June 20, 1977 as well as scenes inside a control room and aerial views of Prudhoe Bay facilities. See AAF-20,001 -- AAF-20,002 for associated items. Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 108 - 1 large reel, 2 medium reels, 1 photo and a magazine article - Start-up at pig launcher. This is the first time they put oil in the pipeline. They put a pig in the pipe first and in it was an electronic device that could detect where the oil was. You could walk along and hear the pig pinging, and they had instruments that could pick it up to track it when it went underground. Bill was the only one allowed inside the pump station because he worked for Alyeska. There were TV crews from all over the world to film this and he was the only one allowed in. Bill was in there filming, and the oil started to come into the pump station, and all of the sudden oil started coming in and spraying all over the station. This guy that worked in there yelled at Bill, 'Does that camera run on electricity?' And Bill answered, 'Yes sir.' He yelled back, 'Shut it off,' so Bill did and he said, 'What the hell is the matter?' The guy said, 'One spark and this whole place blows to kingdom come - you don’t realize but that crude oil has everything in it - it has gas and everything in it, so it will blow this thing to hell.' Once they cleaned it up a little, they let him film again, and he got film of them cleaning it up. The man in the pump station said, 'Mark my words before this oil gets to Valdez someone is going to get killed,' and sure enough someone did. There was a leak in the pipe, and they did not shut off all the electrical stuff, and the thing blew up. No one knows why, but it happened."
[Alyeska start-up, press and TV crews waiting for oil 1977 part 1]
[Alyeska start-up, press and TV crews waiting for oil 1977 part 1]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme has film AAF-20,001 numbered as Bacon 108-1, and titled "Alyeska Start-Up: WP [workprint]-400 feet" The corresponding negative was also included in box. Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 108 - 1 large reel, 2 medium reels, 1 photo and a magazine article - Start-up at pig launcher. This is the first time they put oil in the pipeline. They put a pig in the pipe first and in it was an electronic device that could detect where the oil was. You could walk along and hear the pig pinging and they had instruments that could pick it up to track it when it went underground. Bill was the only one allowed inside the pump station because he worked for Alyeska. There were TV crews from all over the world to film this and he was the only one allowed in. Bill was in there filming and the oil started to come into the pump station and all of the sudden oil started coming in and spraying all over the station. This guy that worked in there yelled at Bill, 'Does that camera run on electricity?' And Bill answered 'Yes sir.' He yelled back 'Shut it off,' so Bill did and he said, 'What the hell is the matter?' The guy said, 'One spark and this whole place blows to kingdom come - you don’t realize but that crude oil has everything in it - it has gas and everything in it so it will blow this thing to hell.' Once they cleaned it up a little they let him film again and he got film of them cleaning it up. The man in the pump station said, 'Mark my words before this oil gets to Valdez someone is going to get killed,' and sure enough someone did. There was a leak in the pipe and they did not shut off all the electrical stuff and the thing blew up. No one knows why but it happened."
[Alyeska start-up, press and TV crews waiting for oil 1977 part 2]
[Alyeska start-up, press and TV crews waiting for oil 1977 part 2]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme AAF-20,002 numbered as Bacon 108-2 and titled "Alyeska Start-Up, Press and TV Crews Waiting for Oil 1977: WP [workprint]-300 feet" [the corresponding negative was also included in box]. See AAF-20417 for an associated item originally labeled Bacon 108-3. Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 108 - 1 large reel, 2 medium reels, 1 photo and a magazine article - Start-up at pig launcher. This is the first time they put oil in the pipeline. They put a pig in the pipe first and in it was an electronic device that could detect where the oil was. You could walk along and hear the pig pinging and they had instruments that could pick it up to track it when it went underground. Bill was the only one allowed inside the pump station because he worked for Alyeska. There were TV crews from all over the world to film this and he was the only one allowed in. Bill was in there filming and the oil started to come into the pump station and all of the sudden oil started coming in and spraying all over the station. This guy that worked in there yelled at Bill, 'Does that camera run on electricity?' And Bill answered 'Yes sir.' He yelled back 'Shut it off,' so Bill did and he said, 'What the hell is the matter?' The guy said, 'One spark and this whole place blows to kingdom come - you don’t realize but that crude oil has everything in it - it has gas and everything in it so it will blow this thing to hell.' Once they cleaned it up a little they let him film again and he got film of them cleaning it up. The man in the pump station said, 'Mark my words before this oil gets to Valdez someone is going to get killed,' and sure enough someone did. There was a leak in the pipe and they did not shut off all the electrical stuff and the thing blew up. No one knows why but it happened."
An American Senator
An American Senator
Contains footage from Senator Ernest Gruening's visit to Turkey. Original notes accompanying film contain the following scene descriptions: "1) Senator is met by Deputy Governor at Eskisehir Border. 2) Senator enters the Province Building. 3) Senator meets the Governor of Eskisehir and talks with him. 4) Departure from the Province Building. 5) Senator receives information on the statue in front of the Province Building. 6) Senator visits the Air Forces Commandership in Eskisehir. 7) Senator visits the Turkish Railway shops in Eskisehir. 8) Senator meets the students at the Eskisehir shops. 9) Senator rides on Devrim Car (first Turkish manufactured car). 10) Senator visits Eskisehir Forest Nursery. 11) Senator visits Iron Industrialists Association in Eskisehir. 12) Senator lunches at Liman Restaurant in Istanbul. 13) Senator, his wife and AID Deputy Director. 14) AID Deputy Director's speech. 15) Senator delivers a speech. 16) Director of Education delivers a speech. 17) The guests listen [to] the speeches. 18) Turkish teachers who participated in course in the United States receive certificates. 19) Senator visits the warehouses constructed by US AID."
[AMOCO-Navarin operations]
[AMOCO-Navarin operations]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme has AAF-20,000 numbered as Bacon 102-1 and titled "AMOCO-Navarin Operations: WP [workprint]-400 feet." It contains footage of men boarding a Boeing 234 Chinook helicopter, the helicopter taking off and then landing at an oil rig or platform in the ocean, a sign that says "Ocean Odyssey," a man in a small control room, drilling operations and men at work aboard an oil rig, a satellite dish and control room, a man being interviewed, more scenes aboard the oil rig, a cargo ship and a sign reading "Maersk Serangoon," a man with binoculars, a pipe and cargo aboard a ship?, a helicopter landing at an airport, and men disembarking from the helicopter. Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 102 - 1 Reel - Film Bill did for AMOCO Oil. They had a contract. Also, they had a lease for fifty miles off of Anwar [ANWR] on the border of Canada and the United States and they wanted a film of the whole operation."
[Annabeth Hanlon collection 1]
[Annabeth Hanlon collection 1]
Footage includes a walking dragline and gold dredge in Ester, travel to Circle City, Indians in Circle showing parkas and furs, the sternwheeler Yukon arriving and passengers disembarking, buildings and scenes around Circle Hot Springs Resort, Eagle Summit, a brief view of the Miller House owners, children clearing snow from a skating rink, and various skating activities including racing and figure skating. Notes accompanying the original film can and box say "mining at Ester, Cripple Creek dragline, dredge, Dorothy Erin (?) go to Circle, Circle Indians, boat at Yukon, birds on road, Indian cemetery, Circle Springs, Miller House, Eagle Summit, Ada Williams, 1937 - Megan Florence and I go to Circle, school festival 1944"
Arctic Haze
Arctic Haze
A documentary about the spread of air pollution into the Arctic from Europe and the Soviet Union. Scientists from around the world work to understand and solve air pollution problems in Alaska and across Northern regions that are caused by industrialization thousands of miles away. Those interviewed include: Matthew Bean of Bethel, Dr. Glenn E. Shaw of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska bush pilot Dennis Miller, Dr. Kenneth A. Rahn of the University of Rhode Island, Dr. Daniel Jaffe of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Dr. Brynjulf Ottar of the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Dr. Tom E. Osterkamp of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Dr. Juan G. Roederer of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, and others. Air pollution, acid rain, ozone depletion, the greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change are all terms that are discussed. The program includes views of tundra regions, research laboratories, and a government observatory for monitoring climatic change located at Barrow.
[Arnie M. Lee and Family collection - 3]
[Arnie M. Lee and Family collection - 3]
Notes with this film say “1943 – 1944, Anne Larsen film of Jergen and family, gold dredge hydraulic moving camp, Snoqualmie ski lodge, ski jumping, Oregon coast, cliff house coast calif?, GJOA expedition, SFO Jergen and Arne, Jerhen’s family? in Calif?” Writing inside the film can says “Chatnika, Kirkland[?], Vasapark[?], Billings, Dahls and Seattle and some snow” and “During the war and some from Alaska.” The film contains footage of small log cabins, a dredge in a dredge pond, mining camp buildings being moved, Snoqualmie Ski Lodge in Washington State, the Cliff House in San Francisco, a plaque in San Francisco commemorating Roald Amundsen’s 1903-1906 Gjoa expedition, the Roald Amundsen monument in San Francisco, and family gatherings and activities outside of Alaska.
[Arnie M. Lee and Family collection - 6]
[Arnie M. Lee and Family collection - 6]
This film is labeled "San Diego, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Alaska Hiway [Highway] to Fairbanks” and notes with the film say “Might be Arne Larsen film, Hiway driving Chevy, 1950s Chevy, Fairbanks, Dave Larsen?, Birch Hill, Dragline, Jergen mining, Gold Dredge Ester or Fox, Circle Hot Springs, Jergen and Guri Lealand, San Diego shipyard, zoo, SFO, LAX.” The film contains footage of Alaska Highway travel, the Riverboat Nenana in a dry dock, Aurora Lodge, a panoramic overview of Fairbanks, mining activities, a gold dredge at work, a dragline in operation, a power plant building, a gold dredge in a float pond, a dragline, hydraulic giants, a conveyor belt, a Circle Hot Springs lodge, the Circle Trading Company building, and scenes outside Alaska.
[Arnie M. Lee and Family collection - 7]
[Arnie M. Lee and Family collection - 7]
This film is labeled “Gold Hill from the beginning, Gold Hill Dredge moving from the start” and “Fairbanks Alaska, Arnie Larsen, Dredge No. 6 moving 1958, Moving dredge at Gold Hill.” The film contains scenes of bulldozers moving Dredge 6 from Gold Hill to Sheep Creek near Fairbanks in 1958, the dredge on wooden cribbing in its new location, and the dredge pond being filled with water via a pipe.
[Art class]
[Art class]
Film contains scenes of a classroom full of artists sketching and painting as a male model sits in a chair at the front of the classroom. Fred Machetanz sketches and paints, and he instructs other artists at their easels or as they look over his shoulder. Fred Machetanz looks at and talks about a display of sketches, swatches and paintings with labels such as “1935 Alaska Unalakleet” and “Materials, Pigments, Glazing,” etc.