Alaska Film Archives

Alaska Review 21
Alaska Review 21
Reporter Mark O. Badger examines the impact of worldwide demand for salmon, the rebuilding of Alaska's salmon stocks, salmon fishing and processing methods, limited entry permits and government regulations, and conflicts within the Alaskan fishing industry. Those interviewed include: Al Adasiak (misspelled in title screen), chairman of the Limited Entry Commission; unidentified people at fish camp; unidentified commercial fisherman; Jack Milnes, aquaculture director for SSERAA(?); Dave Kron, state biologist; Wally Neurenberg; Doug Holenbeck, manager of Harbor Seafoods in Wrangell; Heidi Lee (?), fisherman; Frank Warfel (name likely misspelled in title screen), Wrangell fisherman; Will Bergman, State Department of Fish and Game biologist at Petersburg; Jim Beaton, commercial fisherman from Juneau and member of the State Board of Fisheries; Scott Roth, National Bank of Alaska manager at Petersburg; Carson Boysen, Petersburg artist; Bob Thorstensen, president of Petersburg Fisheries; and unidentified people involved in the fishing industry and residents of southeast Alaska. The program contains views of the Tanana River, a fish camp, fish processing facilities, fishing boats, the Crystal Lake Hatchery in Petersburg, the mending of a gill net, a purse seining demonstration, and several southeast Alaska fishing communities. Program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the Social Security Administration and boat safety.
Alaska Review 22
Alaska Review 22
In the first segment, reporter Erik Eckholm examines the conflict between eagle habitat preservation and timber sales in the economically troubled Haines region. Those interviewed include: Stephen Waste, biologist; Carl Heinmiller, magistrate and president of the Haines Chamber of Commerce; John Schnabel, mill owner; David Nanney, Haines resident; Bill Maki, Haines resident; Merrill Palmer, Haines resident; and Bob La Resche, Alaska Commissioner of Natural Resources. The report contains views of eagles perched in trees and in flight in the Haines area, Haines streets and businesses, Fort Chilkat, the Indian Arts Center at Fort Chilkat, and pulp mill facilities. In the second segment, reporter Mark Weller explores the many ways in which Alaskans cope with the stress of living in an arctic environment. Those interviewed include: Dr. Wandal Winn, psychiatrist and physician; Ken Strain, arctic expert; an unidentified Native Alaskan hunter; Army Sergeant Bill Purrington of Fort Richardson; Mickey Sexton, ARCO spokesman; Ed Zehrung, travel agent; Jerry Ellis of Western Airlines; unidentified airline passengers en route to Hawaii; and unidentified skiers. Report contains views of Fairbanks, Kotzebue, Bethel, Ketchikan, Anchorage, northern Native communities, Prudhoe Bay, Prudhoe Bay recreation facilities, an airport ticket counter, Anchorage International Airport, Alyeska Ski Resort, and a hitchhiker alongside a snowy road. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about cumulative voting/Native Regional Corporations and dividend allocation/Native Regional Corporations.
Alaska Review 23
Alaska Review 23
"Waiting for Spring" is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4957). New narration by Lee Salisbury was added throughout the program for this re-broadcast. The program also contains a Public Service Announcement (PSA) about solar energy.
Alaska Review 24
Alaska Review 24
Reporters Mark Weller and Judithann Roberts review the development of Alaska's railroads. Reporter Mark O. Badger examines the role of railroads in Alaska's economy and future prospects for the Alaska Railroad. Reporter Eric Eckholm explores hardships facing the White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad. Those interviewed include: Mike Kopcha, Alaska Railroad engineer; Bill Dorcy, Alaska Railroad general manager; Daniel Alex, president of Eklutna, Inc.; Red Swanson, Juneau lobbyist; Athol Rytallack of the White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad in Whitehorse; an unidentified railroad worker in Skagway; and Everett Hamme, job steward for the Teamsters union at Skagway. The program contains views of historical photographs of Alaska railroads, Alaska Railroad cars and engines, railworkers and train conductors, Whitehorse, and White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad winter operations. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about child safety and physical fitness.
Alaska Review 25
Alaska Review 25
Reporter Mark Weller provides an overview of Alaska's land classification issues and reports on differing opinions regarding President Carter's use of the Antiquities Act to set aside millions of acres of land in Alaska for several newly created National Monuments. Reporter Mark O. Badger interviews Clark Engle, a hunting guide who shares his views on land classification. Those interviewed include: Ben Shane of the Friends of the Earth; an unidentified protestor; Congressman Morris Udall of Arizona; Senator Mike Gravel of Alaska; Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska; John Katz, special counsel to Alaska's governor; Bob Belous of the National Park Service; Alaska Governor Jay Hammond; Tom Meacham, assistant to Alaska's attorney general; Vernon Wiggins of Citizens for the Management of Alaska Lands (CMAL); Clark Engle, hunting guide; Don Brand; and an unidentified man. The program contains views of protestors, the Great Denali Trespass event, an Alaska hunting camp, and Alaska scenery and wildlife. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the March of Dimes and skiing safety.
Alaska Review 26
Alaska Review 26
The first segment, "Rescue," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4958). The second segment, "See How They Run," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4957). The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about child abuse prevention and stress reduction techniques.
Alaska Review 27
Alaska Review 27
In the first segment, Eric Eckholm reports on Humpback Whales in Alaska waters and efforts to study and protect the giant mammals. Interviewees include whale scientist Sharon Guinn and high school biology teacher Charles Juracz of Juneau. The report contains underwater views of whales off the coast of Hawaii and whales at Glacier Bay. In the second segment, Eric Eckholm reports on the strategic importance of Alaska to the military. Those interviewed include: General Jenes, Alaska Army Commander; General Winfield Scott, Alaska Air Force Commander; Lieutenant Colonel LaLime, chief of the U.S. Air Force 43rd Tactical Squadron; and an unidentified F-4 navigator. The report contains views of Nike-Hercules missiles, military aircraft and equipment, and Jack Frost military maneuvers in Alaska. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about relaxation techniques and solar energy.
Alaska Review 28
Alaska Review 28
The first segment, "Mayday," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4962). The second segment, "Sky Taxi Safety," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4963). The segment was originally titled "Sky Train Safety." The program also contains a Public Service Announcement (PSA) about forest fire prevention.
Alaska Review 29
Alaska Review 29
In the first segment, reporter Mark Weller explores Whittier's potential to become a major Alaskan port. Those interviewed include: William Dorcy, Alaska Railroad general manager; Cecil Zeigler, Whittier mayor; Ross Knight, businessman; and U.S. Senator Mike Gravel of Alaska. The program contains views of the Alaska Railroad tunnels near Whittier, government-built buildings at Whittier, and ports in Whittier, Anchorage, Seward, and Kenai. The second segment, "Eyes of Justice, " is a repeat broadcast from an earlier Alaska Review program (AAF-4962). In the third segment, viewers voice their opinions about an earlier Alaska Review report on the Antiquities Act and show their approval of the use of the Antiquities Act to protect land in Alaska. Those interviewed or quoted include an unidentified Kenai man and Alaska Coalition lobbyist Dee Frankfourth. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about tire pressure safety, VISTA volunteers, and the Boy Scouts of America.
Alaska Review 31
Alaska Review 31
Reporters Eric Eckholm and Mark O. Badger travel with a group of Alaska fishermen to explore bottomfishing techniques in Norway and Denmark and to examine the ways in which those techniques could be adapted to the Alaskan fishing industry. Those interviewed include: Alfred Nygard of the Norway Export Council; Jim Edenso, Alaska's bottomfish coordinator in Juneau; Mike Painter of Ketchikan; Chuck Parsons of Homer; Stan Reddekopp of Juneau; Bjorn Bong; Kurt Bergen, a Norwegian union representative; an unidentified member of Denmark's Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Peter Weis of Denmark; Shari Gross; Dave Osterback of Sand Point; Birgir Danielsen of Faroe Seafoods Marketing; Prime Minister Atla P. Dam; and unidentified speakers. The program contains views of coastal fishing villages in Norway and Denmark, fishing and crabbing vessels, and fish processing facilities.
Alaska Review 32
Alaska Review 32
The Alaska Press Club awarded Alaska Review a public service award for educational programming. Two award-winning segments are re-broadcast in this program. The first segment, "Now that the oil is flowing...," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4964). The second segment, "Reindeer," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4961).
Alaska Review 34
Alaska Review 34
Reporter Mark Weller explores the problems, controversies, and benefits surrounding the development of an agricultural industry in Alaska. Those interviewed include: unidentified fair-goers; Bob Palmer of Juneau, the Governor's special projects coordinator; Don Dinkel of Fairbanks, professor of plant physiology; Arnold Carson of Palmer, former Matanuska Valley colonist; Steve Hamilton of Palmer, dairy farmer; Nick Carney of Palmer, director of the Division of Agriculture; Gene Jenn of Palmer, farmer; Barrie Wilcox of Yelm, Washington; Frank H. McKinney of Delta Junction, grain consultant; Frank Flavin of Anchorage, state ombudsman; Mike Wegener of Seattle, Washington, grain inspector; Don Sundberg, grain specialist; and Masahiro Sasaki, Japanese consulate in Anchorage. The program contains views of the Tanana Valley State Fair and the Palmer State Fair, Matanuska Valley farms, the University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station in Fairbanks, Manley Hot Springs, historical photos and films of early farming and the Matanuska Valley Colony, dairy farm scenes, chicken egg facilities, Delta area farming, and a grain inspection lab. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about physical fitness and economics.
Alaska Review 35
Alaska Review 35
Reporter Mark Weller examines the potential benefits and dangers of drilling for oil in Alaska's offshore waters. Those interviewed include: Don Clocksin of Juneau, with Alaska Legal Services; John Witteveen of Kodiak, fisherman; Carolita Kallour of Anchorage, with the U.S. Department of the Interior; Bill Hopson of Anchorage, with the Alaska Oil and Gas Association; Roger Herrera of Anchorage, with Sohio-BP; Tom Cook of Anchorage, director of the Department of Minerals and Energy for the State of Alaska; Cal Owens, safety supervisor for Union Oil; Vincent O'Reilly, mayor of Kenai; Archie Brower of Barrow, president of the Kaktovik Inupiat Corporation; Dr. Gunter Weller of Fairbanks, with the Arctic OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) Program; Eben Hopson of Barrow, mayor of the North Slope Borough; Laughton Johnson of the Shetland Islands; Mr. Urquhart, director of the Shetland Council; and Hank Pennington of Kodiak, chairman of Kodiak's OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) Advisory Council. The program contains views of people, including Governor Jay Hammond, filling vehicles at gas stations. Also included are scenes of an oil drilling platform in Cook Inlet, a Kenai oil refinery and fire department, subsistence hunters near Barrow, ice in the Beaufort Sea, the Shetland Islands of the United Kingdom, oil spill damage near the Sullom Voe terminal in Shetland, and Kodiak Island. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the March of Dimes, the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, and skateboarding safety.
Alaska Review 36
Alaska Review 36
Mark O. Badger reports on the challenges facing Alaska's rural communities and how the Molly Hootch lawsuit changed education in rural Alaska by arguing that students be able to attend high school in their home villages. Those interviewed include: Molly Hootch of Emmonak; Marshall Lind, commissioner of the Alaska Department of Education; Don Smith, Anchorage assemblyman; Alfred Karmun of Deering; Katherine Mills and Ida Kadashan of Hoonah; unidentified Mt. Edgecumbe High School students; George White, superintendent of the Northwest Arctic School District; unidentified schoolchild; Calvin Moto of Deering; Dr. Judith Kleinfeld of Fairbanks, with the University of Alaska; Dr. Ray Barnhardt of Fairbanks, with the University of Alaska; Marty Zelonky, assistant administrator of the Northwest Arctic School District; Katherine McNamara of McGrath, educator; Enoch Adams of Kivalina, member of the School Board Advisory Committee; Calvin Baker, principal of the Kivalina School; Lowell Sage, Jr., student; and David Watkins, teacher. The program contains views of Emmonak, Kodiak, Mt. Edgecumbe High School in Sitka, Deering High School, the Kivalina School, and drawings and photos and films of early village life and schools in Alaska. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about electrical safety and pneumonia.
Alaska Review 37
Alaska Review 37
Reporter Mark O. Badger explores questions concerning the closure of the Kivalina School due to discipline problems and harassment of the principal and teachers there. Community members express their frustrations and anger with the school administration, and administrators give their points of view. Those interviewed include: George White, superintendent of the Northwest Arctic School District; Enoch Adams of Kivalina, member of the School Board Advisory Committee; Calvin Baker, principal of Kivalina School; Lowell Sage, Jr., student; David Watkins, teacher; Lowell Sage, Sr., student's father; Lena Sage, student's mother; Lucy Adams of Kivalina, former member of the School Board Advisory Committee; Marty Zelonky, assistant administrator of the Northwest Arctic School District; Raymond Hawley, mayor of Kivalina; June Nelson of the Northwest Arctic School Board; and Marshall Lind, commissioner of the Alaska Department of Education. The program contains views of Kivalina, Point Hope, and a class of Point Hope fifth graders. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about energy conservation, chainsaw safety, CARE, forest fire prevention, and seat belt safety.
Alaska Review 38
Alaska Review 38
In the first segment, Alaska Review reports on the state's budget surplus, where the oil revenue will go, and what will happen if and when Alaska's oil resources run out. The permanent fund and permanent fund dividends are discussed. Those interviewed include: unidentified man-on-the-street interviewees; Alaska Governor Jay Hammond; State Representative Dick Randolph of Fairbanks; Robert Hartig of Commonwealth North; Ross Schaff, state geologist; Tom Williams, revenue commissioner; Don Bell of the Alaska Loggers Association; State Representative Terry Gardiner; and Jim Edenso, Alaska's bottomfish coordinator in Juneau. In the second segment, Alaska Review examines the 1979 wreck of the M/V Lee Wang Zin, which caused Alaska's largest oil spill to date. Plans are reviewed for an oil spill contingency plan to deal with future spills in Alaska waters. Those interviewed include: Commander Spoltman of the U.S. Coast Guard; Randy Bayliss of the Department of Environmental Conservation; and fisherman and photographer Matt Donohoe. The report contains views of the overturned vessel, the M/V Lee Wang Zin, in Dixon Entrance. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about senior citizens and the Campaign for Human Development, Alaskan peoples and members of the Protectors of the Land for the Campaign for Human Development, and child abuse prevention.
Alaska Review 39
Alaska Review 39
Alaska Review examines folklore surrounding wolves and the history of interaction between humans and wolves. Conservationists, activists, and biologists debate the appropriateness and effectiveness of aerial wolf hunting as a wildlife management tool in Alaska. A bulletin issued by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regarding the failure of the 1980 aerial wolf hunt due to poor snow conditions is mentioned at the end of the program. Those interviewed include: Will Anderson of Greenpeace Alaska; Bob Hinman of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Ed Andrews, executive director of the Wolf Country Foundation in Boulder, Colorado; Carol Gates, speaker at a 1979 Alaska Department of Fish and Game public hearing; Sam McDowell of the Izaak Walton League; Dr. Gordon Haber, wildlife ecologist; Floyd Tepton, speaker at a 1979 Alaska Department of Fish and Game public hearing; Bruce Snodgrass, speaker at a 1979 Alaska Department of Fish and Game public hearing; Bud Burris, management coordinator for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Fairbanks; Jim Davis of Fairbanks, caribou research biologist; Bill Gasaway of Fairbanks, moose research biologist; Bob Stephenson of Fairbanks, wolf research biologist; Jack Jonas of Jonas Bros. Taxidermy in Denver, Colorado; Jim Pitts of Anchorage, realtor and activist; and Jack Grieb, director of the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The program contains views of wolves and moose, Greenpeace headquarters, and a Colorado taxidermy shop. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about litter and trash pick-up in Alaska and about Juneau history, featuring the story of Juneau photographer Trevor Davis.
Alaska Review 40- part 1
Alaska Review 40- part 1
In this video, host Pete Carran of KAKM-TV talks with John Havelock, director of legal studies for the Justice Center of the University of Alaska in Anchorage. Havelock gives an overview of the history of cameras in the courtroom and discusses issues relevant to the Williams v. Zobel case. Reporter Carroll Hodge of KAKM-TV interviews State Supreme Court Justice Jay Rabinowitz about cameras in the courtroom. Plaintiff Ronald Zobel is interviewed about the case he and his wife Patricia have brought before the court. Judge Ralph Moody is shown and quoted. An assistant attorney general for the state is interviewed. The Zobels' attorney, Mark Sandberg, is interviewed. Counsel for the State, Avrum Gross, is interviewed. Governor Jay Hammond is interviewed. John Havelock discusses each of the justices of the State Supreme Court: Chief Justice Jay Rabinowitz, Justice Edmund Burke, Justice Roger Connor, Justice Warren Matthews, Justice Robert Boochever, and former Justice Diamond as photos of the judges are shown. Counsels for the State, Assistant Attorney General Susan Burke and former State Attorney General Avrum Gross, present arguments for the State of Alaska during a live broadcast of the court proceeding.
Alaska Review 40- part 2
Alaska Review 40- part 2
In this video, counsel for the State Avrum Gross continues his presentation of arguments for the State of Alaska. The program host, Pete Carran of KAKM-TV, discusses the first portion of the proceeding with John Havelock, director of legal studies for the Justice Center of the University of Alaska in Anchorage. Previously recorded man-on-the-street interviews regarding Alaskans' thoughts on the case are shown. Mark Sandberg, attorney for the Zobels, delivers his arguments before the court. Counsel for the State Avrum Gross delivers the State's rebuttal.
Alaska Review 40- part 3
Alaska Review 40- part 3
In this video, counsel for the State Avrum Gross finishes delivering the State's rebuttal, and the court is adjourned. Host Pete Carran of KAKM-TV discusses the proceeding with John Havelock, director of legal studies for the Justice Center of the University of Alaska in Anchorage, as highlights from the proceeding are shown. Reporter Carroll Hodge of KAKM-TV interviews: Mark Sandberg, attorney for the Zobels; plaintiffs Ronald and Patricia Zobel; and Counsels for the State Susan Burke and Avrum Gross.
Alaska Review 41
Alaska Review 41
In the first segment, Mark O. Badger and Edward K. Coll report on the existence of the ice worm "Mesenchytraeus solifugus" in Alaska. Unidentified fairgoers, National Park Service Naturalist Chris Degernes, and unidentified ice worm collectors are interviewed. The report contains views of a group hiking in the Portage Glacier area and people collecting ice worms at Byron Glacier. In the second segment, Alaska Review explores the staging of a direct action protest in the Beaufort Sea by Geenpeace activists opposed to off-shore oil drilling in the area. Those interviewed include: Will Anderson, executive director of Greenpeace in Alaska; Steve Sawyer of Greenpeace; Joanna McFadden of Greenpeace; David Reinhardt (?) of Greenpeace; Mark Roberts of Greenpeace; Michael Bailey, campaign coordinator for Greenpeace; Ralph Cunningham, filmmaker; Lee Tomerlin, ham radio operator; and Larry Leonard, ham radio operator and writer. The report contains views of the Arctic Ocean near Deadhorse, the Happyhose Hotel at Deadhorse, the Sagavanirktok River, Heald Point, a gravel island and oil drilling facilities, and barges at sea. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcoholism and the Campaign for Human Development.
Alaska Review 42
Alaska Review 42
Alaska Review examines major changes taking place within Alaska's judicial system, such as the elimination of plea bargaining, the discovery of sentencing disparity, revisions in the criminal code, the establishment of an appellate court, and the development of a master plan for correctional institutions in the State of Alaska. Those interviewed include: Art Snowden, administrative director of the Alaska Court System; Mike Rubenstein, former executive director of the Alaska Judicial Council; Nick Maroules, research director for the Alaska Judicial Council; Mary Alice Miller, former 4th Judicial District judge; Barry Stern, assistant attorney general; Larry Weeks, district attorney for Anchorage; Roger Endell of the Criminal Justice Center at the University of Alaska; Charles Campbell, director of the Division of Corrections; Brian Porter, chief of the Anchorage Police Department; Colonel Tom Anderson, director of the Alaska State Troopers; and Avrum Gross, former attorney general of the State of Alaska. The program contains brief views of graduation ceremonies for state troopers, an officer making an arrest, and corrections facilities. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about Alaskan peoples and members of the Protectors of the Land for the Campaign for Human Development and the importance of preserving nature for future scientific discoveries.
Alaska Review 43
Alaska Review 43
Proposed petrochemical development in Alaska is explored in this program. Alaskans examine the Dow Shell Chemical group's proposal for six possible development sites in Alaska, including Fairbanks, Point Mackenzie, Kenai, Seward, Valdez, and Fire Island. Those interviewed include: Pete Lehman, project director for Dow Chemical; Fred Ali of the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation; Ellen Widess of San Francisco, an attorney with California's OSHA Administration; Raphael Moure, a Denver industrial hygienist; Jerry White of Alaska's North Slope Borough; John Carlson, mayor of the Alaska's North Star Borough and member of a citizens advisory board to examine petrochemical development in Alaska; Eric Myers, member of citizens advisory board; Steve Hendrixson, environmental engineer with Shell Chemical Company; Tanya Gularte, member of citizens advisory board; Sharon Macklin, member of citizens advisory board; unidentified petrochemical industry executives; Terry Miller, lieutenant governor of Alaska; Millet Keller, member of citizens advisory board; Ernest Mueller, commissioner of the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation; and Jack Jones, Dow Chemical Community and Government Relations officer. The program includes views of a San Francisco and a Louisiana petrochemical facility as well as excerpts from Dow television commercials. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcoholism and chainsaw safety.
Alaska Review 44
Alaska Review 44
The potential for using air-cushion vehicles for transportation, cargo-hauling, and rescue operations in Alaska is investigated in this episode. Those interviewed include: Captain John McGrath of the Canadian Coast Guard; Captain Spoltman of the U.S. Coast Guard; Dave Westrup, part owner of Hovercraft Transportation Services; Aaron Potz (?), hovercraft operator; Dick Longacre, program manager of a government funded air-cushioned vehicle demonstration program; John Bates, deputy commissioner of the Alaska Department of Transportation; and Pat Ryan of the airport authority in Anchorage. The program contains views of various types of hovercraft in operation over land and water, Prudhoe Bay facilities, a gravel island in the Beaufort Sea, a Bethel-area hovercraft operation, and the Alaska Hovertravel Port in Anchorage. The program ends with a preview of an upcoming Alaska Review episode about the Pribilof Islands. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about real estate title insurance and chainsaw safety.
Alaska Review 45
Alaska Review 45
Alaska Review examines opposing views about Alaska's Subsistence Priority law. Those interviewed include: Walter Charlie of the Copper River/Lake Louise area; Josephine Charles and family of Sheldon Point; Dr. John Kruse of the Institute of Social and Economic Research; Sam McDowell of Alaskans for Equal Hunting and Fishing Rights; Bonnie McCord of the Tyonek Village Council; Don Mitchell of Alaskans For Sensible Fish and Game Management; Chris Goll of the Alaska Board of Fisheries; Jimmy Huntington of the Alaska Board of Fisheries; Dennis Kelso of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Tom Schroeder of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Juanita Melsheimer of English Bay; Bobby Kuasnikoff of English Bay; Marty Freidman of Homer, an attorney representing the Kachemak Bay subsistence group; Louis Gjosund, subsistence fisherman; Judy Theringer and Daniel Breslaw, subsistence fishermen; and others. The program contains views of subsistence hunting and fishing activities at the Bishop Mountain Fish Camp on the Yukon River, the Point Hope whale festival, Barrow, Tyonek, English Bay, and other areas of Alaska. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcohol abuse in Alaska and the Independent Quality of Living Center.
Alaska Review 46
Alaska Review 46
Alaska Review examines the innovations of Alaskans who have implemented ways to harness the energy of natural elements such as wind, water, sun, and geothermal resources to provide power in Alaskan communities. Conservation and construction techniques used by individual homeowners as well as municipalities are explored. Those interviewed include: Steve Behnke of Dillingham; Dave Balker (?), manager of Nushugak Electric in Dillingham, Don Markel, projects coordinator of the Division of Energy and Power; Bob Foote of Unalakleet; CJ Phillips (?), president of a corporation interested in developing Pilgrim Springs; Everett Drashner, Cantwell area homesteader; Diane Drashner, Cantwell area homesteader; Joe Marks, owner of a company that developed a wood gasification system; and Bud Root of the Anchorage area. The program contains views of a passively-heated super-insulated home in Dillingham, a waste-heat recovery system used to heat the Dillingham elementary school, wind-powered generators in Unalakleet, hot springs at Pilgrim Springs on the Seward Peninsula, a self-sufficient homestead in Cantwell, a wood gasification system used to create engine fuel from wood, a hydroelectric system, greenhouses, solar panels, and wind turbines.
Alaska Review 47
Alaska Review 47
Alaska Review explores Alaska's waste disposal problems, including concerns about the disposal of hazardous materials at a special waste site near Sterling, the growing population of the Municipality of Anchorage and the rapid filling of the landfill at Merrill Field, and the existence of hazardous wastes left behind by military outposts in Alaska. Members of groups concerned about environmental hazards and the disposal of waste products are interviewed. Those interviewed include: Walt and Elsa Pedersen of Sterling, Alaska; Stan Thompson, mayor of the Kenai Peninsula Borough; Bob Martin, regional manager of the Department of Environmental Conservation in Anchorage; Dave Brown, part owner of Alaska Environmental Industries; Joel Grunwaldt, director of Solid Waste Services for the Municipality of Anchorage; unidentified people-on-the-street interviewees; David Wigglesworth of the Center for the Environment in Anchorage; Steve Kadish, executive director of the Alaska Health Project; Dick Hudson?, manager of Anchorage water treatment facility; and Captain Peter Robles, Jr., of the U.S. Air Force at Elmendorf Air Force Base. The program contains views of the special waste site near Sterling, Alaska, the Union Chemicals Division Kenai Plant facility, Anchorage streets, municipal landfills, public service announcements about recycling and waste disposal, Anchorage water treatment facilities, technicians at work in a water safety testing lab, historic military footage, and military cleanup efforts and facilities.
Alaska Review 48
Alaska Review 48
Mark O. Badger and Edward Coll report on the sealing industry on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs and on recent efforts by the federal government to phase out funding of the seal harvest. Life on the island under Russian and United States rule is examined, and island residents talk about having lived as wards of the federal government and about having been relocated to internment camps in Southeast Alaska during World War II. Managers explain the seal harvest process, and activists talk about their opposition to the harvest. The possible future of the people of St. Paul Island is touched upon. Those interviewed include: Larry Merculief, president of Tanadgusix Corporation; Gabe Stepetin, resident of St. Paul Island; Father Michael Lestenkof, priest on St. Paul Island; Joe Scordino of the National Marine Fisheries Service; Mike Zacharof, supervisor of the By-Products Plant on St. Paul Island; Leslie Dierhauf, veterinarian and voluntary observer of the seal harvest; Captain Paul Watson of Greenpeace; Pamela Wilson, director of the Seal Rescue Fund; and Dr. Charles Fowler of the National Marine Fisheries Service. The program contains views of a St. Paul celebration at the end of sealing season, historical photos and drawings of Aleut peoples, interior and exterior views of the Russian Orthodox Church on St. Paul Island, seal harvest activities and the treatment and packing of seal skins, and scenes from the Wartime Relocation Commission Hearings in Anchorage. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about litter and recycling in Alaska and recycling in general.
Alaska Review 49
Alaska Review 49
Alaska Review covers the debate in Alaska over whether or not nuclear weapons should be used to protect and defend the United States. Topics include the nuclear arms race between the United States and Soviet Union, nuclear arms freeze resolutions put to a vote in three Alaskan cities, Alaska's civil defense plan, evacuation plans, nuclear fallout patterns, and survival plans. Those interviewed include: Steve Williams of Fairbanks, of the Alaskans for the Prevention of Nuclear War; Cindy Marquette of Fairbanks, of the Alaskans for the Prevention of Nuclear War; Don Smith, Anchorage assemblyman; Dave Brook of Anchorage, of the Citizens Concerned about Nuclear War; unidentified people-on-the-street interviewees; Colonel James Grassman, director of operations for the Alaskan Air Command; Jack Cervantes of Wasilla, Southcentral district supervisor for the Alaska Division of Emergency Services; Bruce Staser, director of Civil Defense for the Municipality of Anchorage; John Morris, of Civil Defense for the Municipality of Anchorage; and Linda Duce? of Homer, of the Alaska Institute of Self-Sufficiency and Family Preparedness. The program contains views of historical films and drawings depicting the dropping of nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, gatherings in Alaska to protest the buildup of nuclear weaponry, Elmendorf Air Force Base, maps and depictions of possible damage from nuclear weapons, military bases, hospitals, grocery stores, and equipment and displays at an Alaskan survival fair.
Alaska Review 50
Alaska Review 50
Alaska Review explores the lives of those continuing to pursue a subsistence lifestyle in Alaska despite outside pressures from a quickly changing world and the availability of new tools and methods for hunting and gathering natural resources. The program contains images and interviews that appeared in several earlier Alaska Review programs. Those interviewed include: Arnold Brower, whaling captain; John Evak, subsistence hunter; Juanita Melsheimer of English Bay; Bobby Kuasnikoff of English Bay; Walter Charlie of the Lake Louise area; L. Jolson? of Kachemak City; Judy Theringer and Daniel Breslaw, subsistence fishermen; and Everett and Diane Drashner, homesteaders. The program contains views of Point Hope singers and dancers, a Point Hope whaling celebration, people pulling in fish nets at Bishop Mountain near Galena, scenes at a fish camp, harvesting of fish at English Bay, an Alaskan garden, and a self-sufficient homestead south of Fairbanks.