Alaska Film Archives

[1947 Nalukataq whale feast at Barrow]
[1947 Nalukataq whale feast at Barrow]
Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: “Barrow, Nulakatuk, 1947. After a successful whaling season they have a Nulakatuk celebration which is to celebrate the parting of the whales soul so there is no hard feeling to the whales so they will come again the next year. All the whaling captains get together and have this celebration and if there are a lot of whales killed that season they may have two or three celebrations on different days.", From the Alaska Film Archives, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks., From the William W. Bacon III collection. APR Collection Number 2015-203., AAF-20,079 transferred in 2016 by Reflex Technologies of Burbank, California, to Blu-ray Disc, DVD, and Mac-format external hard drive. Some light and color corrections may have been applied to Blu-ray disc and DVD by Reflex Technologies., Filmmaker's original labeling scheme has film AAF-20,079 numbered as Bacon 17, and titled “1947 Nulakatuk Whale Feast, Barrow.” Film contains scenes of whale and muktuk being distributed at the Nalukataq whale feast at Barrow, people eating and celebrating, blanket toss, men in military uniforms, Alaska Native dancers and drummers, children running and chasing after large vehicle, and more blanket toss.
[1949 Fairbanks flood, mining activities]
[1949 Fairbanks flood, mining activities]
Film contains footage of the Ladd Field Post Cafeteria sign, a man and a woman walking together, a man welding, large machinery, boats on the Chena River, flooded areas in downtown Fairbanks, 1st Avenue Dress Shoppe, swimming pool, Wells Alaska Motors, flooding in a neighborhood, flooding around houses, flooding in the woods, men in a boat, men walking through flood waters, boating in flood waters, Northern Commercial Company power plant with a sternwheeler riverboat parked along bank, Samson Hardware and Mining Machinery, a sunrise in the woods, large pieces of mining equipment, a dredge, men working with hydraulic giants, men working a sluicebox, people around a campfire, people in the woods camping, large mining machinery, farmland (potatoes?), a large dredge bucket, a dragline, two men in a little yellow raft on the water, men walking on the Davidson Ditch pipe, Discovery Claim Felix Pedro sign, people gold panning, a group shot of people showing off goldpans with gold and gold nuggets in them, the landscape surrounding the mining area, KFAR building and tower, the Rapids Meals and Rooms building, Rapids Hunting Lodge (Black Rapids Roadhouse), a group of men on and around a truck, and a large building on fire.
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme has film AAF-20,005 numbered as Bacon 1-01 and titled "Eskimo carver with old bold [bow] drill: WP [workprint]-100 feet." AAF-20,005 has not yet been digitized - it is the workprint for AAF-20,006, which the filmmaker's original labeling scheme has numbered as Bacon 1-02 and titled, "1988 ivory carver with drill in mouth: ECN [Eastman Color Negative]-100 feet." Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 1 - 3 Small Reels, 1 Large Reel - Kotzebue, Nome, Original reels and Work Prints. BIMA is a floating dredge. Huge dredge was digging up gold bearing sand off Nome. Also other shots of Nome on same reel, ivory carver Pat, close up of head shots of dogs, dog team packed with dogs, tourists panning for gold and riding dog sleds, breakwater, tug and barge coming into channel, Front Street of Nome, ivory shop cut in to ivory carver, downtown Nome, the Nugget Inn on Front Street of Nome, Dredge 5 working." [Note that this description does not entirely match actual footage on reels - it is likely that portions of this description were meant for AAF-20,084].
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme has film AAF-20,008 numbered as Bacon 1-04 and titled "BIMA dredge: ECN,ECL-1,200 feet." Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 1 - 3 Small Reels, 1 Large Reel - Kotzebue, Nome, Original reels and Work Prints. BIMA is a floating dredge. Huge dredge was digging up gold bearing sand off Nome. Also other shots of Nome on same reel, ivory carver Pat, close up of head shots of dogs, dog team packed with dogs, tourists panning for gold and riding dog sleds, breakwater, tug and barge coming into channel, Front Street of Nome, ivory shop cut in to ivory carver, downtown Nome, the Nugget Inn on Front Street of Nome, Dredge 5 working." [Note that this description does not entirely match actual footage on reels - it is likely that portions of this description were meant for AAF-20,084].
[Alaska '35]
[Alaska '35]
This film contains footage of Alaska Railroad cars, horses pulling a wagon on a bridge, mountains and glaciers, mountain goats on a hillside, men with a boat on a beach, a street and buildings in Seward, a steam engine and train arriving at Palmer or Matanuska Junction, Matanuska Valley Colony and colonists, farm buildings and farm workers, a hog with piglets, men with pitchforks scooping hay, people in a truck moving furniture, a man and child at a water pump, a hay wagon, barns and silos, people building frame houses, a blacksmith or machinist at work, men moving building supplies with trucks and bulldozers, a family posing next to a finished house, workers and machinery threshing grain or chopping hay, a farmstead with a log home, a Caterpillar crossing railroad tracks, men unloading bags from a truck, people offloading supplies from a train, a bulldozer pulling a load of construction material, several Caterpillars clearing land and grading soil, a train and steam engine, trucks near tents, people with horses, a blacksmith, children in a wagon, the trading post and cooperative store, a family and home, a girl on a ladder, workers finishing house construction, people moving items into a house, a man chopping a tree, a man and boy at a water pump, men pitching hay, a frame home, a log home, a barn and silo, a horse and wagon, a threshing machine, a farm in the distance, and a car on the road.
Alaska 49th state : [part 1]
Alaska 49th state : [part 1]
This film was used for lectures by the Machetanzes when they travelled outside of Alaska. Footage includes the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner headline "Alaska 49th State," George Sundborg checking teletype and noting the passage of statehood legislation on June 30 1958, statehood headlines from the Anchorage Daily Times and Anchorage Daily News, men launching a large star suspended by helium balloons from the Polaris building's roof in Fairbanks, a line of people signing a giant telegram in Fairbanks, a statehood parade down Second Avenue in Fairbanks, Ernest Gruening shaking hands in Anchorage, and graphics showing routes to Alaska. Additional images include passengers embarking on the Riverboat Discovery near Fairbanks, Jim Binkley piloting the boat and talking on a microphone, Mary Binkley with a microphone and an unidentified assistant showing fur to passengers, Alaska Natives at Tanana River fish camp, Alaska Native men building a fishwheel, men retrieving salmon from a fishwheel and processing it for drying, an Alaska Native woman making a birch bark basket, Sara Machetanz looking at a birch bark baby carrier, and Sara with baby Traeger Machetanz. Additional images include children bottle feeding a moose calf, people harvesting grain and vegetables in the Matanuska Valley, an aerial view of an oil drill rig, Healy coal mine, men operating a hydraulic giant and driving thaw points near Fairbanks, a dredge operating near Fairbanks, men using Caterpillars and a dragline to operate a large sluice box, sluice box clean-up, and a man smelting gold into an ingot. Additional images include the Machetanzes Hi Ridge cabin near Palmer during winter, Fred using a dog team and chainsaw to obtain firewood, a moose at a cabin, Fred and Sara travelnig to Palmer during winter, a snow plow and rotary snowblower on the road, and Jan Koslosky with a rifle showing a large Polar Bear hide. Images at the Fur Rendezvous in Anchorage include a fur auction, a weight-pull contest, a blanket toss, a merry-go-round, the start line of World Champion Dog Sled Races, and Northern Alaska Native dancers performing the Wolf Dance.
Alaska 49th state : [part 2]
Alaska 49th state : [part 2]
This film was used for lectures by the Machetanzes when they travelled outside Alaska. Footage includes Open North American dog sled races in Fairbanks and Dr. Roland Lombard wearing bib number one. Additional images include travel on the Alaska Railroad during winter, a man with a reindeer in Fairbanks, downtown Fairbanks, a party at the Atwood home in Anchorage, international travelers arriving at the Anchorage International Airport and Bob Reeve at the airport, a musical conductor and choral group, KTVA television studios and Norma Goodman, and shoppers in a grocery store. Southeast Alaska images include glaciers and travel by ship, amphibious aircraft taking off in Juneau, loggers cutting and hauling trees, Ketchikan Pulp Mill, salmon in a stream, purse seiner and cannery. Additional images include two men going upstream in a canoe and fishing for grayling, and campus buildings at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.
[Alaska Air Guard earthquake film]
[Alaska Air Guard earthquake film]
This film contains scenes of earthquake damage in Anchorage, Kodiak, Seward, and Valdez following the March 27, 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. Title screens indicate the footage was shot by an Alaska Air National Guard Air Transport Squadron.
[Alaska Airlines Lockheed Starliner aircraft]
[Alaska Airlines Lockheed Starliner aircraft]
The donor’s original number and title for AAF-20723 are: “RM 16. Alaska Airlines, Connie OTZ, Cooper Ldg, Sheep.” This film features an Alaska Airlines Lockheed Starliner with "Fly Alaska" on its side (N7316C) landing and taxiing on a snowy runway at Kotzebue in northwest Alaska, an Alaska Airlines ramp agent directing the aircraft on the ground, passengers walking toward and boarding the airplane, and views of sheep on a hill. Note that the Starliner developed out of the Lockheed Super Constellation with the Starliner having a redesigned wing and more powerful engines.
Alaska Division: Great Falls to Fairbanks
Alaska Division: Great Falls to Fairbanks
This is an Army Air Corps training film for crews ferrying aircraft from Great Falls, Montana to Fairbanks, Alaska, where Soviet pilots then took possession of the airplanes. The aircraft were part of the Lend-Lease program in which the United States sent war supplies to the Soviet Union during World War II. Footage includes graphics showing the route, aerial views of runways along the route, views of runways during landings, and graphics advising pilots of procedures for aborting flights. During the life of the Lend-Lease project, nearly 8,000 planes flew along this route, also known as the Alaska-Siberia (ALSIB) route, from Montana to Alaska then on to Krasnoyarsk in Siberia. The film was made by the U.S. Army Air Forces Air Transport Command Overseas Technical Unit.
[Alaska Highway travel, winter carnival, mining]
[Alaska Highway travel, winter carnival, mining]
This film contains footage of scenic outdoor views (possibly along the Alcan Highway), dog mushing, St. Joseph's Hospital and the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in downtown Fairbanks, The Cushman Street Bridge, buildings along the shore including the Pioneer Hotel and Northern Commercial Company power plant, scenes from a Fairbanks winter carnival including a blanket toss, people ice skating and playing hockey in outdoor rink, vehicles, a parade and crowds of people, footage of mining operations with a heavy piece of machinery, a man unloading wood near downtown Fairbanks, men standing in a field, airplanes parked on the ground, two men and a dog standing in snow, a small airplane taxiing in the snow, cars in front of a hardware store, a man standing in front of a house, a man and woman standing on a stone bridge (not in Alaska), mountain views (likely not Alaska), a man in a field with grapes, a woman tending a rose bush, a car in front of a house, scenic landscape views, a sunset through snowy woods, the Northward Building in downtown Fairbanks, a cabin in snowy woods, and a group of people at an indoor gathering.
[Alaska Native celebrations]
[Alaska Native celebrations]
This film contains scenes of different groups of Alaska Native peoples drumming and dancing in Southeast and Northern Alaska, people sharing and eating muktuk (whale) at a celebration in Northern Alaska, and a blanket toss in Northern Alaska (possibly Barrow).
[Alaska Native Land Claims symposium]
[Alaska Native Land Claims symposium]
AAF-13175 is a 1/2-inch open reel videotape labeled "Alaska Native Land Claims Symposium, speaker: Neil Bassett representing USDI-BLM, Master." A representative from the U.S. Department of the Interior/Bureau of Land Managament speaks during a symposium on Alaska Native lands claims.
Alaska Review 01
Alaska Review 01
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. Lieutenant Governor Lowell Thomas, Jr., provides a brief description of the ballot initiative procedure as Alaska Review considers three initiatives scheduled for the upcoming 1976 November ballot. The first segment, "It's Your Choice: The Capital Sites, " deals with the proposal to move the state capital from Juneau to one of three proposed sites in Southcentral Alaska. The proposed sites of Larson Lake, Mt. Yenlo, and Willow are reviewed. Those interviewed include Capital Site Selection Committee member Leonard Lane, Frank Harris of Anchorage, Mat-Su Borough Manager Wes Howe, Mat-Su Borough Planner Bill Long, Carroll Close of Talkeetna, Gus Scheele of Wasilla, David Freer of Juneau, Juneau Mayor Virginia Kline, and unidentified man-on-the-street interviewees. The second segment, "Unicameralism: Uni-What?" examines the possibility of combining the state senate and house of representatives into a single legislative body. Those interviewed include Tom Fink of Anchorage, Wendell Kay of Anchorage, Cecilia "Pudge" Kleinkauf, Alaska Senator from Anchorage Joe Orsini, and Jack Doyle of the Legislative Affairs Agency. The third segment, "Limited Entry: A Necessary Evil?" deals with an attempt to repeal Alaska's limited entry restrictions on commercial fishermen. Those interviewed include Kodiak fisherman Dave Herrnsteen, Special Assistant to the Governor Bob Palmer, Alaska Representative from Kodiak Ed Naughton, fisherman Fred Lange (spelling?), Sam McDowell of the Isaac Walton league, Chief of Commercial Fisheries Carl Rosier, Wally Nuremberg, hatchery president Armin Koernig, Bob Blake of Cordova, President of the United Fishermen of Alaska Knute Johnson, Bill Hall of Cordova, and unidentified commercial fishermen. Program also contains public service announcements (PSA's) about alcohol abuse, forest fires, and pollution and litter.
Alaska Review 02
Alaska Review 02
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce this program. The first segment covers issues surrounding the decline of the Western Arctic Caribou Herd in Northwest Alaska. The impacts of the decline as well as solutions, such as predator control, are discussed. Those interviewed include Deputy Director of the Division of Game Bob Hinman, University of Alaska Biologist Dr. David Klein, Regional Caribou Biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game Jim Davis, Chairman of the State Board of Game Dr. Sam Harbo, NANA Regional Corporation President John Schaeffer, and several unidentified hunters, as well as Steven and Mildred Sampson of Noorvik and the Snyder Family of Noorvik. The second segment examines conflicting views of timbering in the Tongass National Forest. Those interviewed from Port Protection on Prince of Wales Island include Allen Stein, Howard Bendleton, Ernie Watson, seven-year-old Jimmy Ramsey, and Ezra Stone. Other interviewees include Tongass Conservation Society member Malcolm Doiron of Ketchikan, Southeast Alaska Conservation Council and Anchorage Sierra Club member Ted Whitesell, U.S. Senator from Alaska Mike Gravel, Ketchikan Pulp Company manager Don Finney, head of the U.S. Forest Service in Alaska John Sandor, Ketchikan District Timber Manager for the U.S. Forest Service Pete Mondich, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game habitat biologist Steve Haavig. Program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) about forest fires, heart disease, and alcohol abuse.
Alaska Review 03
Alaska Review 03
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. The first segment deals with small airplane safety issues in Alaska. Issues include the increased number of airplane crashes, safety concerns, pilot training, weather conditions and preparedness, and FAA regulations. Those interviewed include: pilot Jerry Olson; head of the Alaska office of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Frank Malone; owner of Webber Air Service in Ketchikan Jack Swaim (misidentified in title screen); pilot Wes Lynch in Kivalina; air service owner Paul Haggland of Fairbanks; Alaska Governor and pilot Jay Hammond of Naknek and Juneau; Alaska Regional Director of the FAA Lyle Brown; and the unidentified witness of a small plane crash. The second segment examines oil tanker safety in Alaskan waters, including Prince William Sound. Footage includes the breakup and sinking of the oil tanker Argo Merchant in 1976, the Port of Long Beach in California, N.A.S.C.O shipyards in San Diego, Puget Sound in Washington, and the Port of Valdez and Valdez Narrows in Alaska. Issues discussed include oil tanker construction, navigation challenges at the Port of Valdez, and ways to minimize oil spill risks. Those interviewed include: Chuck Champion, Alaska's Pipeline Coordinator; Walt Parker, leader of the Alaska Governor's task force on tankers; Captain Roletti of the oil tanker Sea Tiger; Admiral Hayes, head of the Alaska Command of the U.S. Coast Guard; Dave Stevens, State of Washington tanker expert; Alaska State Senator Chancy Croft; Ernst Mueller, commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation; A.B. Mookhoek, head of Exxon's Marine Oceans Operations and chairman of the Marine Subcommittee of Alyeska; Bill Morrice, Valdez Port Director; Captain Bill Fiskin, in charge of vessel loading; and Dr. Betty Willard of the President's Council on Environmental Quality. The third segment, reported by Janet Archibald, covers the struggle to keep the Anchorage Daily News in business. Those interviewed include: Kay Fanning, publisher of the Anchorage Daily News; Hugh Fleisher, co-chairman of the Committee for Two Newspapers; Robert Atwood, publisher of the Anchorage Daily Times; and Lee Jordan, publisher of the Chugiak-Eagle River Star. Program includes public service announcements (PSAs) about the Council on Aging, child abuse, and human development.
Alaska Review 04
Alaska Review 04
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. In the first segment, Alaska Review correspondent Janet Archibald examines the future of the military in Alaska. Interviewees include: General James Boatner of the U.S. Army; Captain Richard Frase of the U.S. Army; Sergeant Jonny Ray of the U.S. Army; Major Dave Moss of the U.S. Army; Colonel George Robertson of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; and Richard Eakins, director of the Alaska Division of Economic Enterprise.Footage features wintertime Jack Frost training exercises at Ft. Greely, the Bolio Lake Test Site, Eielson Air Force Base, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Fort Richardson, Fort Wainwright, and U.S. Coast Guard vessels at Juneau. In the second segment, the conflict between the Teamsters Union in Alaska and the Prinz Brau Brewery in Anchorage is investigated. Ed Bennett interviews: Peter Bading, brewery developer and founder of Prinz Brau Brewery in Alaska; Tom Kelly, former Alaska Commissioner of Natural Resources; Gerhardt Konitzky, Prinz Brau brewery manager; Heinrich Reich, brewmaster for Prinz Brau Brewery; Mike Gordon, owner of Chilkoot Charlie's in Anchorage; and Larry Wooten, owner of Party-Time Liquors. Many others involved in Alaska's alcohol industry are mentioned or quoted. Images include brewing and bottling facilities at Prinz Brau Brewery, Alaska liquor stores, and the Teamsters Mall and Hospital. [Note: Ed Bennett calls Prinz Brau the first brewery in the state. He corrects himself on Alaska Review #5. Prinz Brau is the first producing brewery in Anchorage.]. The third segment explores the ways in which lobbyists and lobbying influence Alaska lawmaking. Eric Eckholm interviews: Alaska State Senators Bill Ray, Pat Rodey, and Clem Tillion; Alaska State Representative Bob Bradley; lobbyists Waco Shelly representing Mobil Oil, J.B. Hanford representing Odom, Tim Bradner representing BP-Alaska, Lewis Dischner representing Teamsters Local 959 and other entities, and Bill Overstreet representing Alaska School Boards; former Alaska State Representative Bill Parker; and Herb Montoya, chairman of the Alaska Public Offices Commission (APOC). Program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcoholism, gas mileage stickers on new cars, and services available for disabled children.
Alaska Review 05
Alaska Review 05
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. In the first segment, they explore the high cost of car and home insurance in Alaska. Those interviewed include: unidentified people-on-the-street; Sergeant Warren Suddock of the Anchorage Police Department; Darrell Larrigan of Allstate Insurance; Sue Fison, head of the Fairbanks Pipeline Impact Information Center; Richard Block, head of the Alaska State Division of Insurance; Jack Randolph of State Farm Insurance; Buck Whitaker, University of Alaska fire chief; Russel Wertz, homeowner; John Carlson, mayor of the Fairbanks North Star Borough; and Alaska State Representative Rick Urion. The film also includes views of Anchorage streets, auto accidents, Alaska body shops, and Fairbanks area homes. The second segment investigates research on the Aurora Borealis at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks. Interviewees include: Professor Hans Nielsen of the Geophysical Institute; Professor Tom Hallinan of the Geophysical Institute; and Neil Brown, range supervisor at Poker Flats. Images are included of: the Atmospheric Sciences Lab MET Team at Poker Flats, Geophysical Institute video tapes of aurora activity; Geophysical Institute facilities at the University of Alaska Fairbanks; and the Poker Flats Research Range. The third segment covers the politics, management, and finance problems of the University of Alaska. Those interviewed include: Alaska Representative and Speaker of the House Hugh Malone; Kathryn Ostrosky, former Alaska Representative; Dr. Paul Goodwin, former university instructor; Dr. Andrea Helms, university political science instructor; Ralph McGraph of the Community College Teachers' Union; Brian Brundin, former Board of Regents president; Dr. Max Hullinger, former university vice president of finance; Dr. Robert Hiatt, former university president; Alaska Senator Jalmar Kerttula; Alaska Representative and House Finance Chairman Steve Cowper; and Dr. Charles Ferguson, interim university president. At end of the program, a correction is made regarding brewing companies in Alaska. Photos of the Pioneer Brewing Company and Arctic Brewing Company in Fairbanks were provided by Renee Blahuta of the University of Alaska Archives. Mention is also made of other Alaska breweries. Program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about human development, special education, and gas-saving tips.
Alaska Review 06
Alaska Review 06
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. The first segment, "Future Shake," examines the destructive potential of earthquakes in Alaska. It features interviews with geologist William Long, former Alaska Governor Walter Hickel, soil specialist Irv Long, Anchorage City Planner Lidia Selkregg, soils engineer Harry Lee, structural engineer John Aho, soils engineer Jim Rooney, scientist Niren Biswas, and Dr. Neil Davis. The program contains film footage of the aftermath of the 1964 Good Friday Earthquake in Alaska as well as views of downtown Anchorage, the Palmer Observatory, and the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks. The second segment, "Growing Old in the Cold," outlines special problems facing Alaska's elderly. It includes views of the Palmer Pioneer Home, the Glenmore (spelling?) Nursing Home in Anchorage, and the community of Grayling, Alaska. Those interviewed include senior citizen Lula Behn, Jimmy Alexander of Grayling, Kay Hitchcock of the Palmer Pioneer Home, Loyette Goodell of Alaska Legal Services agency, and nurse's aide Ann Harrington. The third segment, "Seward: A Time to Prepare," looks at the impact of possible offshore oil development near Seward. It includes interviews with Seward Mayor Dick Neve, Seward realtor Dick Erickson, Seward City Manager Johnny Johnson, Jim Matthews of Exxon, and Cliff Center are included. The program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) about forest fire prevention, education and the aging, and birth defect prevention and the March of Dimes.
Alaska Review 07
Alaska Review 07
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. The first segment explores what the 200-mile limit means to Alaska. Interviewees include: U.S. Senator Ted Stevens; Elmer Rasmuson (name misspelled in title screen), chairman of the North Pacific Management Council; Tom Casey, head of the Kodiak Fishermen's Marketing Association; Ed Wickersham, special agent for the National Marine Fisheries Service; and Captain Richard T. Brower of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell. The footage includes views of a North Pacific Management Council meeting, Kodiak harbor, crabbing vessels, foreign fishing vessels in the Gulf of Alaska, the boarding of foreign vessels by the U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell. The second segment contains a public relations demonstration of oil tanker movement through the Valdez narrows. It includes interviews with: Captain Thomas DeTemple of the Tanker ARCO Fairbanks and Jim Banister of ARCO. The third segment examines alcoholism and alcohol abuse in Alaska as well as alcohol legislation and bootlegging issues. Those interviewed include: Alaska Governor Jay Hammond; Alaska State Representative Nels Anderson; Bob Cole of the State Office of Alcoholism; unidentified recovered alcoholics; Dennis Kelso, alcohol researcher; Ben Marsh, executive director of the Cabaret Hotel and Restaurant Association; police officer John W[?] of Bethel; Nard Nichols, former Nome police officer; Bob Vanderpool of Red Devil; Conn Murray, Anchorage advertiser; Robert Renshaw, mayor of Nome; and Fritz Larson of Napaskiak. The video also includes footage of bars and liquor stores in Anchorage, Bethel and Nome. It also contains views of the Mercury Inn Liquor Store in Red Devil and at the Village of Napaskiak. Program includes Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcoholism, pollution, and human development.
Alaska Review 09
Alaska Review 09
The first segment, reported by Ed Bennett, deals with land development in Anchorage and possible corruption within the city building department. Those interviewed include: Anchorage City Auditor Larry Campbell, "Anchorage Daily News" reporter Bob Porterfield, Building Division Chief Odin Strandberg, Alaska Public Interest Research Group Director Jamie Love, former Planning and Zoning Commissioner Arliss Sturgulewski, and land developer Peter Zamarello. The second segment, reported by Eric Eckholm, deals with moose population management and subsistence hunting in Alaska. Those interviewed include hunting guide Clark Engle, Director of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game Bob Rausch, wildlife biologist Dr. Gordon Haber, booking agent Don Brand, Peter John of Minto, Carlos Frank of Minto, State Ombudsman Frank Flavin, and US Department of Fish and Wildlife enforcement officer Cpl. Boutang. The report includes views of Ambler and Minto. The third segment, produced by Janet Archibald, covers Alaska's high oil consumption and the development of alternative energy sources. Coal, hydro-energy, geothermal energy, wind and solar power, wood-burning power, and tidal-water power are all explored. Those interviewed include: Alaska Power Administration head Robert Cross, conservationist and University of Alaska professor Dr. Robert Weeden, Joe Usibelli of Usibelli Coal Mine, William McConkey of the State Division of Energy and Power, Patrick Dobey of the State Division of Minerals and Energy Management, Dr. Richard Nuwy (sp?) of Seward, Jim Gum (sp?) of the Bureau of Land Management, and Charles and Gladys Dart of Manley Hot Springs. The report includes views of the Snettisham Hydroelectric Project in Juneau, the Susitna River, Devil Canyon, Manley Hot Springs, remote solar-powered installations of the Bureau of Land Management, and Delta Junction. The fourth segment, reported by Mark O. Badger, touches on a proposal to change the name of Mt. McKinley to Denali. Those interviewed include Congressman Ralph Regula of Ohio and Peg Tileston of Anchorage. The program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) from the National High Blood Pressure education program, the National Audubon Society, and CARE.
Alaska Review 10
Alaska Review 10
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm provides an examination of proposed designs for Alaska's possible new capital. Members of the Capital Site Planning Commission meet to discuss designs for the capital site as put forth by five architectural firms. Those interviewed include: Mort Hoppenfeld, executive director of the Capital Site Planning Commission; Henrik Bull, architect; Ken De May, architect; Charles Behlke, chairman of the Capital Site Planning Commission; Sterling Gallagher, Commissioner of Revenue; and Jim Croll, public relations director for the Capital Site Planning Commission. In the second segment, Mark O. Badger and Eric Eckholm report on the ways that Juneau residents and leaders are coping with the proposed capital move. Those interviewed include: unidentified man-on-the-street interviewees; C.B. Bettisworth, founder of the FRANK Committee (Frustrated Responsible Alaskans Needing Knowledge); Bill Overstreet, Juneau mayor; Bill Ray, Alaska state senator from Juneau; and Dave Fremming, president of the Greater Juneau Chamber of Commerce. In the third segment, Eric Eckholm reports on the first ever public auction of raw Alaskan gold in Fairbanks during November, 1977. Banker Bob Miller of Fairbanks, auctioneer Joe Kasler of Skagway, and several unidentified Alaska gold miners and buyers are interviewed. In the fourth segment, Ed Bennett reports on land development issues across Alaska. Those interviewed include: Maxine Silcott of Anchorage; Connie Sipe, chief of the State Attorney General's Consumer Protection Office; Bill McIntyre, a Fairbanks area land developer; Don Sheets of the Great Kennicott Land Company; Terry McWilliams, director of the Alaska State Parks Division; Sumner Putman, resident of Anchorage and McCarthy; Vincent Guzzardi, head of Golden North Realty in Fairbanks and developer of Wild Lake; Ray Bane of the National Park Service at Bettles; Bill Morgan of the Department of Environmental Conservation; and Dan St. John of Fairbanks, friend of the Meader family. Clips are shown from the Fred and Elaine Meader film "Year of the Caribou, " filmed at Wild Lake. The report also includes views of Anchorage, Fairbanks, the Matanuska Valley, Kennicott, McCarthy, and Wild Lake. The program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) about pollution, the United Negro College Fund, alcoholism, and forest fire prevention.
Alaska Review 12
Alaska Review 12
In the first segment, reporter Mark O. Badger examines Inupiaq culture, its dependence on and connection to marine mammals, and the development of a cash economy in Alaska villages. Those interviewed include John Burns, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist; John Evak of Kotzebue; Pete Sereadlook of Wales; Dr. George Harry, head of the Marine Mammal Division of NOAA in Seattle; Eben Hopson, North Slope Borough mayor; Arnold Brower, Barrow whaling captain; an unidentified Point Hope whaling captain; and Carl Gravougle, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist. The report contains views of Barrow, Round Island, Wales, Point Hope, hunters, whales and whaling, subsistence activities, community celebrations, polar bears, and walruses. In the second segment, reporter Eric Eckholm explores the history of sled dog racing and talks to dog mushers about their philosophies on raising sled dogs. Dog mushers Gareth Wright and Roxy Woods are interviewed. Scenes of sled dog races and dog yards are included in the report. In the third segment, Ed Bennett reports on problems with the state's prison system and on some of the programs and policies being implemented to correct the problems. Those interviewed include: Attorney General Avrum Gross; Bill Huston, director of the Alaska Division of Corrections; Dan Masden, correctional officers training supervisor; State Representative Russ Meekins of Anchorage; Charles Moses, administrator at the 6th Avenue Annex facility in Anchorage; Marilyn Davis, counselor at the 6th Avenue Annex facility in Anchorage; N. Steven Krause, superintendent of the Eagle River jail; Natalie Brooks, member of the citizens advisory committee for the Eagle River jail; Sharon Scramstad, teacher at the Ridgeview women's jail; and the Rev. William Lyons, parole board head. The report includes views of the Juneau jail, the 6th Avenue Annex facility in Anchorage, the Eagle River jail, and other corrections facilities. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the United Negro College Fund, careers and education, and the National High Blood Pressure Education Program.
Alaska Review 13
Alaska Review 13
In the first segment, Eric Eckholm reports on the diversity of Alaskan opinions concerning land use in Alaska and explores the myths and realities of the D-2 land classification bill being debated in the U.S. Congress. Those interviewed include: environmentalist Jim Kowalski of Fairbanks; Congressman Morris Udall of Arizona; Walter Parker, state co-chairman of the Joint Federal State Land Use Planning Commission; Congressman John Seiberling of Ohio; Congressman Don Young of Alaska; Carl Randolph, president of U.S. Borax; Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska; Byron Mallott (misspelled in title screen), president of the Alaska Federation of Natives; Alaska State Representative Steve Cowper of Fairbanks; Chip Toma, Southeast Alaska environmentalist and fisherman; and Bob La Resche, Alaska Commissioner of Natural Resources. The report contains views of the Kobuk sand dunes, Ambler, mountains, bays, glaciers, backpackers, a mining camp, protesters, Alaska industrial and recreational activities, Usibelli Coal Mine at Healy, Lynn Canal, and other areas of Alaska. In the second segment, reporter Mark O. Badger examines Alaska's litter problem and the debate over a ballot initiative to institute a ten-cent bottle and can deposit. Those interviewed include: Mrs. Walter Butts of Juneau; George Brennan, Fairbanks Boy Scouts leader; Virginia Dal Piaz of Juneau, lobbyist for the Alaska Conservation Society; Alaska State Representative Mike Miller of Juneau; Jerry Abramezyk of Anchorage, chairman of the Industry Environmental Council; Alaska State Senator Mike Colletta of Anchorage; and Henry Jackson, operations manager for K & L Distributors. The report contains images of liquor stores and bottling facilities, trash pickup efforts along the Glenn Highway, and recycling facilities in Anchorage. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the March of Dimes birth defects prevention program, the United Negro College Fund, and the Peace Corps. In the third segment, reporter Ed Bennett explores the unique hazards faced by those traveling in remote and non-remote areas of Alaska as well as rescue operations that come to the aid of people in distress. Those interviewed include Captain Paul Yost of the U.S. Coast Guard; Danny Hackett of the U.S. Coast Guard; Henry Jolian of the U.S. Coast Guard; Jack Morrow of the Department of Highways; Jim Hale, mountaineer; Russ Anderson of Anchorage, head of the Alaska Civil Air Patrol; Colonel Pat Whitaker, head of the Rescue Coordination Center at Elmendorf Air Force Base; and Mike Carlton, airplane crash survivor. The report contains scenes of wilderness area rescue missions, Coast Guard ships, rescue helicopters, avalanche prevention efforts, Hatcher Pass avalanche survival class, Kahiltna Glacier, Mt. McKinley, park ranger briefing for Mt. McKinley climbers, small airplanes in flight, and a small airplane wreckage site.
Alaska Review 14
Alaska Review 14
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm examines the Homestead Initiative, a state proposal to give 30 million acres of state land in 20 and 40 acre parcels to the first people who claim it. Interviewees include: State Representative Mike Bierne; Governor Jay Hammond; unidentified people-on-the-street interviewees; State Representative Oral Freeman; Riley Roberts, Talkeetna homesteader; Wade Roberts, Talkeetna homesteader; Wesley Roberts, Talkeetna homesteader; State Representative Bob Bradley; Ted Smith, director of Land and Water Management; Janet McCabe of the Land Use Planning Commission; Jon Maloney, initiative backer; and Alaska Senator Kay Poland. This segment is repeated with higher video quality in AAF-4963. In the second segment, Fred Machetanz is interviewed about his life and artwork as well as his philosophies about Alaska. This segment is repeated with higher video quality in AAF-4965. In the third segment, reporter Mark O. Badger examines conflicting views concerning future use of the Haul Road, or Dalton Highway, from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay as control of the road passes from the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company to the State of Alaska. Those interviewed include: unidentified interviewees; Fran Ulmer, head of Governor's Division of Policy Development and Planning; Bruce Hart (?) of Juneau, formerly with the Policy Development Office; an unidentified Alaska Native man; State Representative Charlie Parr of Fairbanks; Wally Behr, manager of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce; Jim and Elaine Childs, owners of a truck maintenance facility at Prudhoe Bay; Arlo "Smiley" Wells, Haul Road trucker; Don Harris (?), Commissioner of Transportation; an unidentified man, chief and mayor of Allakaket; unidentified men; and Dick Logan (?), chief of the habitat section for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The report contains views of the Haul Road, oil workers, and Alaska Native communities. In the fourth segment, reporter Eric Eckholm explores the changes that took place in the City of Valdez due to the Good Friday Earthquake of 1964 and the arrival and development of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Those interviewed include: John Kelsey, Valdez business owner; Bill Tingley, marine pilot; and Commander Homer Purdy of the U.S. Coast Guard. The report contains views of Valdez, tanker traffic, pipeline terminal facilities, and the Valdez Narrows. The program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) about the National Audubon Society, drug abuse prevention, the Consumer Information Center, and small business.
Alaska Review 15
Alaska Review 15
This program presents a look back at three Alaska Press Club Award-winning segments from 1977. The first segment, "The Dividing of the Sea," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4952). The second segment, "The Lobby and the Law," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4949). The third segment, "Tankers: Boon or Bust?," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4948). In the fourth segment, "Bottle Bill Rebuttal," Jerry Abramczyk of Anchorage and Chris Foster of Juneau revisit some opposing ideas concerning a proposed bottle bill that was reported on in Alaska Review 13 (AAF-4958), in which reporter Mark O. Badger examined Alaska's litter problem and the debate over a ballot initiative to institute a ten-cent bottle and can deposit.
Alaska Review 16
Alaska Review 16
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm reviews the history of reindeer herding in Alaska and reports on the harvesting of reindeer antlers for sale to foreign markets. Interviewees include: Mr. Chueng of San Francisco's Chinatown, herbal merchant selling deer antlers for medicinal purposes; Alfred Carmen of Deering, reindeer herder; Dr. Jack Luick of Fairbanks, reindeer scientist; Jim Isabelle, helicopter pilot; Jung Wang, antler buyer; and John Schaeffer, president of NANA Regional Corporation. The report contains views of a helicopter-aided reindeer roundup in Deering, reindeer antler removal, Chinatown in San Francisco, and the Teller reindeer round-up. In the second segment, Mark Weller reports on the status of the state-owned Alaska Marine Highway System, its vessels, passengers, and employees. Interviewees include: Bill Hudson, director of the Alaska Marine Highway System; John Sund of Ketchikan; Captain Gary Cramer of the M/V Taku; Captain Herb Story of the M/V Columbia; Ken Beselin, chief engineer of the M/V Columbia; Greg O'Clary of the Inland Boatmen's Union (IBU); Pat Tarte of the Port of Bellingham; Jube Howe of the Port of Seattle; Mary Fabry of Ketchikan, travel agent; Erv Hagerup, chief mate of the M/V Taku; and Len Laurence (misspelled in title screen) of Ketchikan, travel agent. The report contains views of coastal Alaska communities, marine highway vessels, dock workers, passengers, and scenes aboard ferries. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about drug abuse prevention and the Arts.
Alaska Review 17
Alaska Review 17
In the first segment, Mark O. Badger reports on airplane safety in Alaska and concerns over rising aviation accident rates. Those interviewed include: pilot Jack Swaim of Ketchikan; helicopter pilot Jim Isabelle of Teller; an unidentified pilot; Carl Jorwitz, tower chief at Anchorage International Airport; Martin Ondra, air traffic controller at Merrill Field; Joe Wilbur of Anchorage, owner of Wilbur Flight Operations and Wilbur Flight School; Sumner Putnam, commercial pilot; Captain Welch, Alaska jet pilot; Gene Morris, FAA accident prevention coordinator; and an unidentified private pilot. The program contains views of Anchorage International Airport and Merrill Field, Lake Hood, Wilbur Flight School, airplanes in flight near Valdez, a Juneau departure, a Sitka approach, a Ketchikan approach, and cockpits of various aircraft in flight. In the second segment, reporter Eric Eckholm examines the recently allowed use of cameras in Alaska courtrooms. Interviewees include: Art Snowden, court director; Joe Josephson, Anchorage lawyer; Rob Stapleton, Anchorage Daily News reporter; and Howard Weaver of the Alaska Advocate. The program contains views of courtrooms and pressrooms. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcohol awareness and the CARE program.
Alaska Review 18
Alaska Review 18
In the first segment, Mark O. Badger reports on the safety of air taxi operations across Alaska and the desire by many that the Federal Aviation Administration establish a more effective accident prevention program. Those interviewed include: Gene Morris, FAA accident prevention coordinator; Jim Dodson of the Air Carriers Association; Bill Bauman, air charter pilot; Jake Johnson, member of the Alaska Transportation Commission; and Dean Karrel of Alaska Travel Air. The program contains views of Alaska airports and airplane wreckage sites. The second segment, "The Homestead Initiative: Free Land?" is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4959). The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about forest fire prevention and carpooling.
Alaska Review 19
Alaska Review 19
In the first segment, reporter Mark Weller examines the struggle between Ahtna, Inc. and the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company over agreements made prior to construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Those interviewed include: Roy Tansy, president of Ahtna, Inc.; Christine Yazzie, past president of Ahtna, Inc.; Jimmy McKinley of Copper Center; Dean Olson, business advisor to Ahtna, Inc.; unidentified Copper Center residents; Bernie Kline (?) of Copper Center; and John Ratterman, Alyeska spokesman. The program contains scenes from the 1978 AFN Convention in Anchorage as well as views of the pipeline and the Copper Center area. In the second segment, Eric Eckholm reports on controversies surrounding the combating of forest fires in Alaska. Those interviewed include: Jerry Timmins, BLM fire chief for Interior Alaska; Ray Settles, state fire chief; Carl Jeglum, BLM fire researcher; and Davis Perkins, smokejumper and artist. The program contains views of wildfires, fire fighting equipment, fire fighting crews and aircraft. This program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about Social Security and home mortgages.