Alaska Film Archives

Alaska Review 58
Alaska Review 58
Alaska Review examines the rapid growth of Alaska's pollock and bottom-fishing industry and what it means for the state's economy. The report covers topics such as the Magnuson Act, the 200-Mile Limit, joint venture operations, foreign fishing fleets, harvest limits, and new food products such as surimi. Those interviewed include: Thorn (or Thorne?) Tasker of Alaskan Joint Venture Fisheries, Inc.; Al Burch of the Alaska Draggers Association; Chris Riley of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Jim Branson of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council; Greg Baker (?), director of the Office of Commercial Fisheries Development for the State of Alaska; Bob Keating, Joint Venture representative; Colonel Yong Sam Kim of the Samho Moolsan Company of South Korea; Chris Mitchell (?), executive director of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Jerry Babbitt, food scientist with the National Marine Fisheries Service; and Gilbert Francklyn, Dutch Harbor crab fisherman. The program contains views of the Alaska coastline, fishing vessels, the visit of an Alaskan commission to Norway, fish processing facilities, grocery store fish displays, fish preparation at a restaurant, underwater scenes of fish being caught in a bottom trawling net, nets being hauled back aboard boats, graph showing bottom fish harvest levels, scenes from the 1984 North Pacific Fisheries Management Council meeting, a Japanese restaurant, an Alaska Pacific Seafoods processing facility in Kodiak, a food science lab, crab pots and crab boats, and a graph showing a rapid decline in Bering Sea king crab harvest levels.
Alaska Review 59
Alaska Review 59
Alaska Review and Focus North examine the Alaska Native Review Commission, headed by Thomas Berger of Canada, which performed an independent review of the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act on behalf of Native groups in Alaska. The program also touches upon Canada's Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry of the mid 1970s, which investigated the possible impacts of a proposed gas pipeline through Canada's Yukon and Northwest Territories. Those interviewed include: Justice Thomas Berger; Frank T'Seleie, former chief of Good Hope, Northwest Territories; Bob Blair, president of Foothills Pipeline, Ltd.; Alaska Governor Bill Sheffield; David Case, author; Willie Hensley, Alaska Native leader; Mary Malchoff of Port Graham; Elenore McMullen of Port Graham; Lydia Robart of Port Graham; and others. The program contains views of villages in Canada and Alaska, community hearings in Canada and Alaska, an Inuit Circumpolar Conference (ICC) meeting, Anchorage streets, subsistence and trapping activities, and Native dancing and cultural activities.
Alaska Review 60
Alaska Review 60
Alaska Review examines efforts by American fishermen and processors to control and market Alaska's bottom fish. Those interviewed include Jim Branson, executive director of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council; Thorne Tasker of Alaskan Joint Venture Fisheries; David Harville with the Kodiak and Western Trawler Group; Rick Lauber of the Pacific Seafood Processors Association; Chris Mitchell of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Taekuk Chung of Transocean Enterprises of South Korea; and U.S. Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska. The program contains views of commercial fishing activities, foreign and domestic fishing boats and fleets, U.S. Coast Guard vessels, a graph depicting fish harvest levels, and fish processing facilities.
Alaska Review 61
Alaska Review 61
Alaska Review examines problems associated with intensive use of the Kenai River in Alaska and the conflict between commercial and sport fishermen. Topics discussed include loss of salmon habitat, erosion along the river bank, and disturbances caused by boat wakes. Those interviewed include: Paul Ruesch, fisheries biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Bob Penny, chairman of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Bix Bonney, member of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Jim Evenson, commercial fisherman; Melvin Johnson, commercial fisherman; Stan Thompson, Kenai Peninsula Borough mayor; Harry Gaines, fishing guide; Christopher Estes of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Bill Long, hydrologist with the Alaska Department of Natural Resources; Neil Johannsen, director of Parks for the Alaska Department of Natural Resources; Jeff Jefferson, president of the Kenai River Advisory Board; Sharon Jean (?) of the Kenai River Advisory Board; and Alaska Governor Bill Sheffield. The program includes views of fishermen in small boats and standing on the banks of the Kenai River, people posing with salmon, recreational vehicles along a river, combat fishing, fish traps in use during Alaska's territorial days, fish netting, an annual meeting of the Board of Fisheries, sonar fish counter, biologists tagging salmon, fish processing facilities, protestors, Cook Inlet, and cabins along the river.