Alaska Film Archives

A Letter for Debra Anne
A Letter for Debra Anne
AAF-13990 and AAF-13991 are presented by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs. Both films contain identical scenes with AAF-13990 narrated in English and AAF-13991 narrated in Yupik. The program is about the development of the Primary Eskimo Program (PEP), a bilingual language program introduced in Yupik-speaking Alaska Native communities of southwest Alaska. Opening credits list Area Director Clarence Antioquia, Assistant Area Director Emil Kowalczyk, Federal Program Director William Menojah, Jr., Title 1 Director Willard Walters, Agency Superintendent of Education S. William Benton, and Education Specialist Calvin Lundy. Cinematographer is Frank Johnson. Editor is Guy Bishop. Storyteller is John Haymer. Yupik interpreter is Oscar Alexie. The film is written and directed by Jerry Warner, and it's produced by Jerry Warner and Associates. The program contains scenes in Kwethluk and Akiachak, Alaska, including elementary-aged students learning to speak, read, and write in both Yupik and English. In 2018, Juliana Carlson, originally from Kwethluk, identified the following individuals who appear in the film: Ethel Peter (at 01:42, center girl with red and black shirt); Deborah, Mabel or Mary Constantine (at 02:16); Deborah Ann Michael of Kwethluk (at 5:07); the Kwethluk First Grade class including teacher Lillian Michael McGill, John Andrew, Jr., Paul Jackson, Anastasia Michael, Wassiliie Paul, Juliana Guy, Matthew Dillon, Minnie Nicori, William Nicolai and Olga Nick (at 05:41); Kwethluk First Graders John Andrew, Jr. and Juliana Guy (at 06:16); Lynn Jones (at 07:24); Alice Alexie, Veronica Michael (left), and Daniel Jackson (at 07:58); Samson Mann and Matthew Nicori (at 17:39); Kwethluk BIA first grade teacher Lillian Michael McGill (at 19:22); James Michael, Lillian Michael and Lola Evan (at 22:47); Sophie Owens Lowery (at 23:21); Kwethluk 3rd and 4th Graders (at 23:55); Elena Pasitnal (left), Elena Chimegalrea (center), and Marla Evan (right) (at 24:29); Deborah Michael of Kwethluk (at 26:46); and Wassillie Paul of Kwethluk (at 27:20).
A Letter for Debra Anne
A Letter for Debra Anne
AAF-13990 and AAF-13991 are presented by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs. Both films contain identical scenes with AAF-13990 narrated in English and AAF-13991 narrated in Yupik. The program is about the development of the Primary Eskimo Program (PEP), a bilingual language program introduced in Yupik-speaking Alaska Native communities of southwest Alaska. Opening credits list Area Director Clarence Antioquia, Assistant Area Director Emil Kowalczyk, Federal Program Director William Menojah, Jr., Title 1 Director Willard Walters, Agency Superintendent of Education S. William Benton, and Education Specialist Calvin Lundy. Cinematographer is Frank Johnson. Editor is Guy Bishop. Storyteller is John Haymer. Yupik interpreter is Oscar Alexie. The film is written and directed by Jerry Warner, and it's produced by Jerry Warner and Associates. The program contains scenes in Kwethluk and Akiachak, Alaska, including elementary-aged students learning to speak, read, and write in both Yupik and English. In 2018, Juliana Carlson, originally from Kwethluk, identified the following individuals who appear in the film: Ethel Peter (at 01:42, center girl with red and black shirt); Deborah, Mabel or Mary Constantine (at 02:16); Deborah Ann Michael of Kwethluk (at 5:07); the Kwethluk First Grade class including teacher Lillian Michael McGill, John Andrew, Jr., Paul Jackson, Anastasia Michael, Wassiliie Paul, Juliana Guy, Matthew Dillon, Minnie Nicori, William Nicolai and Olga Nick (at 05:41); Kwethluk First Graders John Andrew, Jr. and Juliana Guy (at 06:16); Lynn Jones (at 07:24); Alice Alexie, Veronica Michael (left), and Daniel Jackson (at 07:58); Samson Mann and Matthew Nicori (at 17:39); Kwethluk BIA first grade teacher Lillian Michael McGill (at 19:22); James Michael, Lillian Michael and Lola Evan (at 22:47); Sophie Owens Lowery (at 23:21); Kwethluk 3rd and 4th Graders (at 23:55); Elena Pasitnal (left), Elena Chimegalrea (center), and Marla Evan (right) (at 24:29); Deborah Michael of Kwethluk (at 26:46); and Wassillie Paul of Kwethluk (at 27:20).
A Man for the '70s
A Man for the '70s
This is a 1968 campaign film about the background and political vision of Mike Gravel prior to his election to the U.S. Senate. Bob Bartlett, Hubert Humphrey, and Ted Kennedy are briefly seen. The film covers the topics of campaign stresses, the development of oil fields in Alaska, and the need to create jobs in Alaska. The film reviews Gravel's childhood in Springfield, Massachusetts, his years in the military, and his family life in Anchorage and Washington D.C. Scenes in Alaska include Alaska Railroad travel, statehood activity in Anchorage and Juneau, a trailer park or mobile home park, building construction, Juneau, Nome ?, union halls, Sitka, and other unidentified scenes.
Alaska 49th state : [part 1]
Alaska 49th state : [part 1]
This film was used for lectures by the Machetanzes when they travelled outside of Alaska. Footage includes the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner headline "Alaska 49th State," George Sundborg checking teletype and noting the passage of statehood legislation on June 30 1958, statehood headlines from the Anchorage Daily Times and Anchorage Daily News, men launching a large star suspended by helium balloons from the Polaris building's roof in Fairbanks, a line of people signing a giant telegram in Fairbanks, a statehood parade down Second Avenue in Fairbanks, Ernest Gruening shaking hands in Anchorage, and graphics showing routes to Alaska. Additional images include passengers embarking on the Riverboat Discovery near Fairbanks, Jim Binkley piloting the boat and talking on a microphone, Mary Binkley with a microphone and an unidentified assistant showing fur to passengers, Alaska Natives at Tanana River fish camp, Alaska Native men building a fishwheel, men retrieving salmon from a fishwheel and processing it for drying, an Alaska Native woman making a birch bark basket, Sara Machetanz looking at a birch bark baby carrier, and Sara with baby Traeger Machetanz. Additional images include children bottle feeding a moose calf, people harvesting grain and vegetables in the Matanuska Valley, an aerial view of an oil drill rig, Healy coal mine, men operating a hydraulic giant and driving thaw points near Fairbanks, a dredge operating near Fairbanks, men using Caterpillars and a dragline to operate a large sluice box, sluice box clean-up, and a man smelting gold into an ingot. Additional images include the Machetanzes Hi Ridge cabin near Palmer during winter, Fred using a dog team and chainsaw to obtain firewood, a moose at a cabin, Fred and Sara travelnig to Palmer during winter, a snow plow and rotary snowblower on the road, and Jan Koslosky with a rifle showing a large Polar Bear hide. Images at the Fur Rendezvous in Anchorage include a fur auction, a weight-pull contest, a blanket toss, a merry-go-round, the start line of World Champion Dog Sled Races, and Northern Alaska Native dancers performing the Wolf Dance.
Alaska 49th state : [part 2]
Alaska 49th state : [part 2]
This film was used for lectures by the Machetanzes when they travelled outside Alaska. Footage includes Open North American dog sled races in Fairbanks and Dr. Roland Lombard wearing bib number one. Additional images include travel on the Alaska Railroad during winter, a man with a reindeer in Fairbanks, downtown Fairbanks, a party at the Atwood home in Anchorage, international travelers arriving at the Anchorage International Airport and Bob Reeve at the airport, a musical conductor and choral group, KTVA television studios and Norma Goodman, and shoppers in a grocery store. Southeast Alaska images include glaciers and travel by ship, amphibious aircraft taking off in Juneau, loggers cutting and hauling trees, Ketchikan Pulp Mill, salmon in a stream, purse seiner and cannery. Additional images include two men going upstream in a canoe and fishing for grayling, and campus buildings at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.
Alaska Review 01
Alaska Review 01
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. Lieutenant Governor Lowell Thomas, Jr., provides a brief description of the ballot initiative procedure as Alaska Review considers three initiatives scheduled for the upcoming 1976 November ballot. The first segment, "It's Your Choice: The Capital Sites, " deals with the proposal to move the state capital from Juneau to one of three proposed sites in Southcentral Alaska. The proposed sites of Larson Lake, Mt. Yenlo, and Willow are reviewed. Those interviewed include Capital Site Selection Committee member Leonard Lane, Frank Harris of Anchorage, Mat-Su Borough Manager Wes Howe, Mat-Su Borough Planner Bill Long, Carroll Close of Talkeetna, Gus Scheele of Wasilla, David Freer of Juneau, Juneau Mayor Virginia Kline, and unidentified man-on-the-street interviewees. The second segment, "Unicameralism: Uni-What?" examines the possibility of combining the state senate and house of representatives into a single legislative body. Those interviewed include Tom Fink of Anchorage, Wendell Kay of Anchorage, Cecilia "Pudge" Kleinkauf, Alaska Senator from Anchorage Joe Orsini, and Jack Doyle of the Legislative Affairs Agency. The third segment, "Limited Entry: A Necessary Evil?" deals with an attempt to repeal Alaska's limited entry restrictions on commercial fishermen. Those interviewed include Kodiak fisherman Dave Herrnsteen, Special Assistant to the Governor Bob Palmer, Alaska Representative from Kodiak Ed Naughton, fisherman Fred Lange (spelling?), Sam McDowell of the Isaac Walton league, Chief of Commercial Fisheries Carl Rosier, Wally Nuremberg, hatchery president Armin Koernig, Bob Blake of Cordova, President of the United Fishermen of Alaska Knute Johnson, Bill Hall of Cordova, and unidentified commercial fishermen. Program also contains public service announcements (PSA's) about alcohol abuse, forest fires, and pollution and litter.
Alaska Review 10
Alaska Review 10
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm provides an examination of proposed designs for Alaska's possible new capital. Members of the Capital Site Planning Commission meet to discuss designs for the capital site as put forth by five architectural firms. Those interviewed include: Mort Hoppenfeld, executive director of the Capital Site Planning Commission; Henrik Bull, architect; Ken De May, architect; Charles Behlke, chairman of the Capital Site Planning Commission; Sterling Gallagher, Commissioner of Revenue; and Jim Croll, public relations director for the Capital Site Planning Commission. In the second segment, Mark O. Badger and Eric Eckholm report on the ways that Juneau residents and leaders are coping with the proposed capital move. Those interviewed include: unidentified man-on-the-street interviewees; C.B. Bettisworth, founder of the FRANK Committee (Frustrated Responsible Alaskans Needing Knowledge); Bill Overstreet, Juneau mayor; Bill Ray, Alaska state senator from Juneau; and Dave Fremming, president of the Greater Juneau Chamber of Commerce. In the third segment, Eric Eckholm reports on the first ever public auction of raw Alaskan gold in Fairbanks during November, 1977. Banker Bob Miller of Fairbanks, auctioneer Joe Kasler of Skagway, and several unidentified Alaska gold miners and buyers are interviewed. In the fourth segment, Ed Bennett reports on land development issues across Alaska. Those interviewed include: Maxine Silcott of Anchorage; Connie Sipe, chief of the State Attorney General's Consumer Protection Office; Bill McIntyre, a Fairbanks area land developer; Don Sheets of the Great Kennicott Land Company; Terry McWilliams, director of the Alaska State Parks Division; Sumner Putman, resident of Anchorage and McCarthy; Vincent Guzzardi, head of Golden North Realty in Fairbanks and developer of Wild Lake; Ray Bane of the National Park Service at Bettles; Bill Morgan of the Department of Environmental Conservation; and Dan St. John of Fairbanks, friend of the Meader family. Clips are shown from the Fred and Elaine Meader film "Year of the Caribou, " filmed at Wild Lake. The report also includes views of Anchorage, Fairbanks, the Matanuska Valley, Kennicott, McCarthy, and Wild Lake. The program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) about pollution, the United Negro College Fund, alcoholism, and forest fire prevention.
Alaska Review 11
Alaska Review 11
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm examines the development of Alaska's Native Corporations and explores some of the growing pains and management troubles experienced by Calista Corporation, one of Alaska's largest Native Corporations. Those interviewed include: Tony Vaska of Bethel; Fred Notti, one of the directors for Calista Corporation; Charlie Kairaivak of Chefornak, acting general manager for group of village corporations; Lyman Hoffman, city manager of Bethel; Mary Stachelrodt, former Calista Corporation employee; and Oscar Kawagley, president of Calista Corporation. The report contains views of Anchorage, Bethel and Chefornak. In the second segment, Janet Archibald reports on early Alaska aviation with photos and film clips of Alaska pioneer aviators and their aircraft. Her report leads into a discussion of current air routes and the controversies surrounding air service to bush communities in Alaska. In the third segment, reporter Ed Bennett explores the ways in which government policies encouraged development of monopolistic air service to Alaskan Bush communities. The adverse impact of Wien Airline's growth and movement away from providing air service to the Bush is also discussed. Those interviewed include: Ray Petersen, chairman of the board of Wien Air Alaska; Dick Galleher, president of Munz Northern Airlines; Jake Johnson, member of the Alaska Transportation Commission; Ray Gabriel, general store owner at Kivalina; Bob Schaeffer, Kotzebue representative of the Maniilaq Association; Bob Chapman, chief pilot for Munz Northern Airlines; Dick Steinman, Alaska field office chief for the Civil Aeronautics Board; Howard Killen, former Wien Airlines mechanic; and unidentified airline passengers. The report contains views of various Alaska Bush community airports. In the fourth segment, Eric Eckholm reports on some Alaskans' dissatisfaction with available television broadcast choices and their disappointment at what they see as a lack of media coverage of local news and public affairs issues. The impact of emerging satellite technologies is also discussed. Those interviewed include: Pauline Utter of the Alaskans for Better Media organization; Bob Fleming, radio station owner; Michael Porcaro, head of the Alaska Public Broadcast Commission; Peg Tileston of the Alaskans for Better Media; Ted Lehne, commercial broadcaster in Fairbanks; Charles Northrip, executive producer of "Capital 78, " a publicly funded television program; Jim Orvik, University of Alaska researcher; Axel Johnson of Emmonak; and an unidentified school teacher. The program contains views of television news broadcasts, radio shows, broadcast stations including KFAR in Fairbanks, and Emmonak. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the American Medical Association, child abuse prevention, and the National Center for Productivity and Quality of Working Life.
Alaska Review 12
Alaska Review 12
In the first segment, reporter Mark O. Badger examines Inupiaq culture, its dependence on and connection to marine mammals, and the development of a cash economy in Alaska villages. Those interviewed include John Burns, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist; John Evak of Kotzebue; Pete Sereadlook of Wales; Dr. George Harry, head of the Marine Mammal Division of NOAA in Seattle; Eben Hopson, North Slope Borough mayor; Arnold Brower, Barrow whaling captain; an unidentified Point Hope whaling captain; and Carl Gravougle, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist. The report contains views of Barrow, Round Island, Wales, Point Hope, hunters, whales and whaling, subsistence activities, community celebrations, polar bears, and walruses. In the second segment, reporter Eric Eckholm explores the history of sled dog racing and talks to dog mushers about their philosophies on raising sled dogs. Dog mushers Gareth Wright and Roxy Woods are interviewed. Scenes of sled dog races and dog yards are included in the report. In the third segment, Ed Bennett reports on problems with the state's prison system and on some of the programs and policies being implemented to correct the problems. Those interviewed include: Attorney General Avrum Gross; Bill Huston, director of the Alaska Division of Corrections; Dan Masden, correctional officers training supervisor; State Representative Russ Meekins of Anchorage; Charles Moses, administrator at the 6th Avenue Annex facility in Anchorage; Marilyn Davis, counselor at the 6th Avenue Annex facility in Anchorage; N. Steven Krause, superintendent of the Eagle River jail; Natalie Brooks, member of the citizens advisory committee for the Eagle River jail; Sharon Scramstad, teacher at the Ridgeview women's jail; and the Rev. William Lyons, parole board head. The report includes views of the Juneau jail, the 6th Avenue Annex facility in Anchorage, the Eagle River jail, and other corrections facilities. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the United Negro College Fund, careers and education, and the National High Blood Pressure Education Program.
Alaska Review 13
Alaska Review 13
In the first segment, Eric Eckholm reports on the diversity of Alaskan opinions concerning land use in Alaska and explores the myths and realities of the D-2 land classification bill being debated in the U.S. Congress. Those interviewed include: environmentalist Jim Kowalski of Fairbanks; Congressman Morris Udall of Arizona; Walter Parker, state co-chairman of the Joint Federal State Land Use Planning Commission; Congressman John Seiberling of Ohio; Congressman Don Young of Alaska; Carl Randolph, president of U.S. Borax; Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska; Byron Mallott (misspelled in title screen), president of the Alaska Federation of Natives; Alaska State Representative Steve Cowper of Fairbanks; Chip Toma, Southeast Alaska environmentalist and fisherman; and Bob La Resche, Alaska Commissioner of Natural Resources. The report contains views of the Kobuk sand dunes, Ambler, mountains, bays, glaciers, backpackers, a mining camp, protesters, Alaska industrial and recreational activities, Usibelli Coal Mine at Healy, Lynn Canal, and other areas of Alaska. In the second segment, reporter Mark O. Badger examines Alaska's litter problem and the debate over a ballot initiative to institute a ten-cent bottle and can deposit. Those interviewed include: Mrs. Walter Butts of Juneau; George Brennan, Fairbanks Boy Scouts leader; Virginia Dal Piaz of Juneau, lobbyist for the Alaska Conservation Society; Alaska State Representative Mike Miller of Juneau; Jerry Abramezyk of Anchorage, chairman of the Industry Environmental Council; Alaska State Senator Mike Colletta of Anchorage; and Henry Jackson, operations manager for K & L Distributors. The report contains images of liquor stores and bottling facilities, trash pickup efforts along the Glenn Highway, and recycling facilities in Anchorage. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the March of Dimes birth defects prevention program, the United Negro College Fund, and the Peace Corps. In the third segment, reporter Ed Bennett explores the unique hazards faced by those traveling in remote and non-remote areas of Alaska as well as rescue operations that come to the aid of people in distress. Those interviewed include Captain Paul Yost of the U.S. Coast Guard; Danny Hackett of the U.S. Coast Guard; Henry Jolian of the U.S. Coast Guard; Jack Morrow of the Department of Highways; Jim Hale, mountaineer; Russ Anderson of Anchorage, head of the Alaska Civil Air Patrol; Colonel Pat Whitaker, head of the Rescue Coordination Center at Elmendorf Air Force Base; and Mike Carlton, airplane crash survivor. The report contains scenes of wilderness area rescue missions, Coast Guard ships, rescue helicopters, avalanche prevention efforts, Hatcher Pass avalanche survival class, Kahiltna Glacier, Mt. McKinley, park ranger briefing for Mt. McKinley climbers, small airplanes in flight, and a small airplane wreckage site.
Alaska Review 14
Alaska Review 14
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm examines the Homestead Initiative, a state proposal to give 30 million acres of state land in 20 and 40 acre parcels to the first people who claim it. Interviewees include: State Representative Mike Bierne; Governor Jay Hammond; unidentified people-on-the-street interviewees; State Representative Oral Freeman; Riley Roberts, Talkeetna homesteader; Wade Roberts, Talkeetna homesteader; Wesley Roberts, Talkeetna homesteader; State Representative Bob Bradley; Ted Smith, director of Land and Water Management; Janet McCabe of the Land Use Planning Commission; Jon Maloney, initiative backer; and Alaska Senator Kay Poland. This segment is repeated with higher video quality in AAF-4963. In the second segment, Fred Machetanz is interviewed about his life and artwork as well as his philosophies about Alaska. This segment is repeated with higher video quality in AAF-4965. In the third segment, reporter Mark O. Badger examines conflicting views concerning future use of the Haul Road, or Dalton Highway, from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay as control of the road passes from the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company to the State of Alaska. Those interviewed include: unidentified interviewees; Fran Ulmer, head of Governor's Division of Policy Development and Planning; Bruce Hart (?) of Juneau, formerly with the Policy Development Office; an unidentified Alaska Native man; State Representative Charlie Parr of Fairbanks; Wally Behr, manager of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce; Jim and Elaine Childs, owners of a truck maintenance facility at Prudhoe Bay; Arlo "Smiley" Wells, Haul Road trucker; Don Harris (?), Commissioner of Transportation; an unidentified man, chief and mayor of Allakaket; unidentified men; and Dick Logan (?), chief of the habitat section for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The report contains views of the Haul Road, oil workers, and Alaska Native communities. In the fourth segment, reporter Eric Eckholm explores the changes that took place in the City of Valdez due to the Good Friday Earthquake of 1964 and the arrival and development of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Those interviewed include: John Kelsey, Valdez business owner; Bill Tingley, marine pilot; and Commander Homer Purdy of the U.S. Coast Guard. The report contains views of Valdez, tanker traffic, pipeline terminal facilities, and the Valdez Narrows. The program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) about the National Audubon Society, drug abuse prevention, the Consumer Information Center, and small business.
Alaska Review 15
Alaska Review 15
This program presents a look back at three Alaska Press Club Award-winning segments from 1977. The first segment, "The Dividing of the Sea," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4952). The second segment, "The Lobby and the Law," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4949). The third segment, "Tankers: Boon or Bust?," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4948). In the fourth segment, "Bottle Bill Rebuttal," Jerry Abramczyk of Anchorage and Chris Foster of Juneau revisit some opposing ideas concerning a proposed bottle bill that was reported on in Alaska Review 13 (AAF-4958), in which reporter Mark O. Badger examined Alaska's litter problem and the debate over a ballot initiative to institute a ten-cent bottle and can deposit.
Alaska Review 16
Alaska Review 16
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm reviews the history of reindeer herding in Alaska and reports on the harvesting of reindeer antlers for sale to foreign markets. Interviewees include: Mr. Chueng of San Francisco's Chinatown, herbal merchant selling deer antlers for medicinal purposes; Alfred Carmen of Deering, reindeer herder; Dr. Jack Luick of Fairbanks, reindeer scientist; Jim Isabelle, helicopter pilot; Jung Wang, antler buyer; and John Schaeffer, president of NANA Regional Corporation. The report contains views of a helicopter-aided reindeer roundup in Deering, reindeer antler removal, Chinatown in San Francisco, and the Teller reindeer round-up. In the second segment, Mark Weller reports on the status of the state-owned Alaska Marine Highway System, its vessels, passengers, and employees. Interviewees include: Bill Hudson, director of the Alaska Marine Highway System; John Sund of Ketchikan; Captain Gary Cramer of the M/V Taku; Captain Herb Story of the M/V Columbia; Ken Beselin, chief engineer of the M/V Columbia; Greg O'Clary of the Inland Boatmen's Union (IBU); Pat Tarte of the Port of Bellingham; Jube Howe of the Port of Seattle; Mary Fabry of Ketchikan, travel agent; Erv Hagerup, chief mate of the M/V Taku; and Len Laurence (misspelled in title screen) of Ketchikan, travel agent. The report contains views of coastal Alaska communities, marine highway vessels, dock workers, passengers, and scenes aboard ferries. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about drug abuse prevention and the Arts.
Alaska Review 19
Alaska Review 19
In the first segment, reporter Mark Weller examines the struggle between Ahtna, Inc. and the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company over agreements made prior to construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Those interviewed include: Roy Tansy, president of Ahtna, Inc.; Christine Yazzie, past president of Ahtna, Inc.; Jimmy McKinley of Copper Center; Dean Olson, business advisor to Ahtna, Inc.; unidentified Copper Center residents; Bernie Kline (?) of Copper Center; and John Ratterman, Alyeska spokesman. The program contains scenes from the 1978 AFN Convention in Anchorage as well as views of the pipeline and the Copper Center area. In the second segment, Eric Eckholm reports on controversies surrounding the combating of forest fires in Alaska. Those interviewed include: Jerry Timmins, BLM fire chief for Interior Alaska; Ray Settles, state fire chief; Carl Jeglum, BLM fire researcher; and Davis Perkins, smokejumper and artist. The program contains views of wildfires, fire fighting equipment, fire fighting crews and aircraft. This program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about Social Security and home mortgages.
Alaska Review 02
Alaska Review 02
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce this program. The first segment covers issues surrounding the decline of the Western Arctic Caribou Herd in Northwest Alaska. The impacts of the decline as well as solutions, such as predator control, are discussed. Those interviewed include Deputy Director of the Division of Game Bob Hinman, University of Alaska Biologist Dr. David Klein, Regional Caribou Biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game Jim Davis, Chairman of the State Board of Game Dr. Sam Harbo, NANA Regional Corporation President John Schaeffer, and several unidentified hunters, as well as Steven and Mildred Sampson of Noorvik and the Snyder Family of Noorvik. The second segment examines conflicting views of timbering in the Tongass National Forest. Those interviewed from Port Protection on Prince of Wales Island include Allen Stein, Howard Bendleton, Ernie Watson, seven-year-old Jimmy Ramsey, and Ezra Stone. Other interviewees include Tongass Conservation Society member Malcolm Doiron of Ketchikan, Southeast Alaska Conservation Council and Anchorage Sierra Club member Ted Whitesell, U.S. Senator from Alaska Mike Gravel, Ketchikan Pulp Company manager Don Finney, head of the U.S. Forest Service in Alaska John Sandor, Ketchikan District Timber Manager for the U.S. Forest Service Pete Mondich, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game habitat biologist Steve Haavig. Program also contains public service announcements (PSAs) about forest fires, heart disease, and alcohol abuse.
Alaska Review 20
Alaska Review 20
The first segment, "Fred Machetanz: An Alaskan Master," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4959). The second segment, "Blazing Skies," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4950). The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the Consumer Information Center, social responsibility, and solar energy.
Alaska Review 21
Alaska Review 21
Reporter Mark O. Badger examines the impact of worldwide demand for salmon, the rebuilding of Alaska's salmon stocks, salmon fishing and processing methods, limited entry permits and government regulations, and conflicts within the Alaskan fishing industry. Those interviewed include: Al Adasiak (misspelled in title screen), chairman of the Limited Entry Commission; unidentified people at fish camp; unidentified commercial fisherman; Jack Milnes, aquaculture director for SSERAA(?); Dave Kron, state biologist; Wally Neurenberg; Doug Holenbeck, manager of Harbor Seafoods in Wrangell; Heidi Lee (?), fisherman; Frank Warfel (name likely misspelled in title screen), Wrangell fisherman; Will Bergman, State Department of Fish and Game biologist at Petersburg; Jim Beaton, commercial fisherman from Juneau and member of the State Board of Fisheries; Scott Roth, National Bank of Alaska manager at Petersburg; Carson Boysen, Petersburg artist; Bob Thorstensen, president of Petersburg Fisheries; and unidentified people involved in the fishing industry and residents of southeast Alaska. The program contains views of the Tanana River, a fish camp, fish processing facilities, fishing boats, the Crystal Lake Hatchery in Petersburg, the mending of a gill net, a purse seining demonstration, and several southeast Alaska fishing communities. Program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the Social Security Administration and boat safety.
Alaska Review 22
Alaska Review 22
In the first segment, reporter Erik Eckholm examines the conflict between eagle habitat preservation and timber sales in the economically troubled Haines region. Those interviewed include: Stephen Waste, biologist; Carl Heinmiller, magistrate and president of the Haines Chamber of Commerce; John Schnabel, mill owner; David Nanney, Haines resident; Bill Maki, Haines resident; Merrill Palmer, Haines resident; and Bob La Resche, Alaska Commissioner of Natural Resources. The report contains views of eagles perched in trees and in flight in the Haines area, Haines streets and businesses, Fort Chilkat, the Indian Arts Center at Fort Chilkat, and pulp mill facilities. In the second segment, reporter Mark Weller explores the many ways in which Alaskans cope with the stress of living in an arctic environment. Those interviewed include: Dr. Wandal Winn, psychiatrist and physician; Ken Strain, arctic expert; an unidentified Native Alaskan hunter; Army Sergeant Bill Purrington of Fort Richardson; Mickey Sexton, ARCO spokesman; Ed Zehrung, travel agent; Jerry Ellis of Western Airlines; unidentified airline passengers en route to Hawaii; and unidentified skiers. Report contains views of Fairbanks, Kotzebue, Bethel, Ketchikan, Anchorage, northern Native communities, Prudhoe Bay, Prudhoe Bay recreation facilities, an airport ticket counter, Anchorage International Airport, Alyeska Ski Resort, and a hitchhiker alongside a snowy road. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about cumulative voting/Native Regional Corporations and dividend allocation/Native Regional Corporations.
Alaska Review 23
Alaska Review 23
"Waiting for Spring" is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4957). New narration by Lee Salisbury was added throughout the program for this re-broadcast. The program also contains a Public Service Announcement (PSA) about solar energy.
Alaska Review 24
Alaska Review 24
Reporters Mark Weller and Judithann Roberts review the development of Alaska's railroads. Reporter Mark O. Badger examines the role of railroads in Alaska's economy and future prospects for the Alaska Railroad. Reporter Eric Eckholm explores hardships facing the White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad. Those interviewed include: Mike Kopcha, Alaska Railroad engineer; Bill Dorcy, Alaska Railroad general manager; Daniel Alex, president of Eklutna, Inc.; Red Swanson, Juneau lobbyist; Athol Rytallack of the White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad in Whitehorse; an unidentified railroad worker in Skagway; and Everett Hamme, job steward for the Teamsters union at Skagway. The program contains views of historical photographs of Alaska railroads, Alaska Railroad cars and engines, railworkers and train conductors, Whitehorse, and White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad winter operations. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about child safety and physical fitness.
Alaska Review 25
Alaska Review 25
Reporter Mark Weller provides an overview of Alaska's land classification issues and reports on differing opinions regarding President Carter's use of the Antiquities Act to set aside millions of acres of land in Alaska for several newly created National Monuments. Reporter Mark O. Badger interviews Clark Engle, a hunting guide who shares his views on land classification. Those interviewed include: Ben Shane of the Friends of the Earth; an unidentified protestor; Congressman Morris Udall of Arizona; Senator Mike Gravel of Alaska; Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska; John Katz, special counsel to Alaska's governor; Bob Belous of the National Park Service; Alaska Governor Jay Hammond; Tom Meacham, assistant to Alaska's attorney general; Vernon Wiggins of Citizens for the Management of Alaska Lands (CMAL); Clark Engle, hunting guide; Don Brand; and an unidentified man. The program contains views of protestors, the Great Denali Trespass event, an Alaska hunting camp, and Alaska scenery and wildlife. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the March of Dimes and skiing safety.
Alaska Review 26
Alaska Review 26
The first segment, "Rescue," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4958). The second segment, "See How They Run," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4957). The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about child abuse prevention and stress reduction techniques.
Alaska Review 27
Alaska Review 27
In the first segment, Eric Eckholm reports on Humpback Whales in Alaska waters and efforts to study and protect the giant mammals. Interviewees include whale scientist Sharon Guinn and high school biology teacher Charles Juracz of Juneau. The report contains underwater views of whales off the coast of Hawaii and whales at Glacier Bay. In the second segment, Eric Eckholm reports on the strategic importance of Alaska to the military. Those interviewed include: General Jenes, Alaska Army Commander; General Winfield Scott, Alaska Air Force Commander; Lieutenant Colonel LaLime, chief of the U.S. Air Force 43rd Tactical Squadron; and an unidentified F-4 navigator. The report contains views of Nike-Hercules missiles, military aircraft and equipment, and Jack Frost military maneuvers in Alaska. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about relaxation techniques and solar energy.
Alaska Review 29
Alaska Review 29
In the first segment, reporter Mark Weller explores Whittier's potential to become a major Alaskan port. Those interviewed include: William Dorcy, Alaska Railroad general manager; Cecil Zeigler, Whittier mayor; Ross Knight, businessman; and U.S. Senator Mike Gravel of Alaska. The program contains views of the Alaska Railroad tunnels near Whittier, government-built buildings at Whittier, and ports in Whittier, Anchorage, Seward, and Kenai. The second segment, "Eyes of Justice, " is a repeat broadcast from an earlier Alaska Review program (AAF-4962). In the third segment, viewers voice their opinions about an earlier Alaska Review report on the Antiquities Act and show their approval of the use of the Antiquities Act to protect land in Alaska. Those interviewed or quoted include an unidentified Kenai man and Alaska Coalition lobbyist Dee Frankfourth. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about tire pressure safety, VISTA volunteers, and the Boy Scouts of America.
Alaska Review 31
Alaska Review 31
Reporters Eric Eckholm and Mark O. Badger travel with a group of Alaska fishermen to explore bottomfishing techniques in Norway and Denmark and to examine the ways in which those techniques could be adapted to the Alaskan fishing industry. Those interviewed include: Alfred Nygard of the Norway Export Council; Jim Edenso, Alaska's bottomfish coordinator in Juneau; Mike Painter of Ketchikan; Chuck Parsons of Homer; Stan Reddekopp of Juneau; Bjorn Bong; Kurt Bergen, a Norwegian union representative; an unidentified member of Denmark's Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Peter Weis of Denmark; Shari Gross; Dave Osterback of Sand Point; Birgir Danielsen of Faroe Seafoods Marketing; Prime Minister Atla P. Dam; and unidentified speakers. The program contains views of coastal fishing villages in Norway and Denmark, fishing and crabbing vessels, and fish processing facilities.
Alaska Review 32
Alaska Review 32
The Alaska Press Club awarded Alaska Review a public service award for educational programming. Two award-winning segments are re-broadcast in this program. The first segment, "Now that the oil is flowing...," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4964). The second segment, "Reindeer," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4961).
Alaska Review 34
Alaska Review 34
Reporter Mark Weller explores the problems, controversies, and benefits surrounding the development of an agricultural industry in Alaska. Those interviewed include: unidentified fair-goers; Bob Palmer of Juneau, the Governor's special projects coordinator; Don Dinkel of Fairbanks, professor of plant physiology; Arnold Carson of Palmer, former Matanuska Valley colonist; Steve Hamilton of Palmer, dairy farmer; Nick Carney of Palmer, director of the Division of Agriculture; Gene Jenn of Palmer, farmer; Barrie Wilcox of Yelm, Washington; Frank H. McKinney of Delta Junction, grain consultant; Frank Flavin of Anchorage, state ombudsman; Mike Wegener of Seattle, Washington, grain inspector; Don Sundberg, grain specialist; and Masahiro Sasaki, Japanese consulate in Anchorage. The program contains views of the Tanana Valley State Fair and the Palmer State Fair, Matanuska Valley farms, the University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station in Fairbanks, Manley Hot Springs, historical photos and films of early farming and the Matanuska Valley Colony, dairy farm scenes, chicken egg facilities, Delta area farming, and a grain inspection lab. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about physical fitness and economics.
Alaska Review 35
Alaska Review 35
Reporter Mark Weller examines the potential benefits and dangers of drilling for oil in Alaska's offshore waters. Those interviewed include: Don Clocksin of Juneau, with Alaska Legal Services; John Witteveen of Kodiak, fisherman; Carolita Kallour of Anchorage, with the U.S. Department of the Interior; Bill Hopson of Anchorage, with the Alaska Oil and Gas Association; Roger Herrera of Anchorage, with Sohio-BP; Tom Cook of Anchorage, director of the Department of Minerals and Energy for the State of Alaska; Cal Owens, safety supervisor for Union Oil; Vincent O'Reilly, mayor of Kenai; Archie Brower of Barrow, president of the Kaktovik Inupiat Corporation; Dr. Gunter Weller of Fairbanks, with the Arctic OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) Program; Eben Hopson of Barrow, mayor of the North Slope Borough; Laughton Johnson of the Shetland Islands; Mr. Urquhart, director of the Shetland Council; and Hank Pennington of Kodiak, chairman of Kodiak's OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) Advisory Council. The program contains views of people, including Governor Jay Hammond, filling vehicles at gas stations. Also included are scenes of an oil drilling platform in Cook Inlet, a Kenai oil refinery and fire department, subsistence hunters near Barrow, ice in the Beaufort Sea, the Shetland Islands of the United Kingdom, oil spill damage near the Sullom Voe terminal in Shetland, and Kodiak Island. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about the March of Dimes, the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, and skateboarding safety.
Alaska Review 36
Alaska Review 36
Mark O. Badger reports on the challenges facing Alaska's rural communities and how the Molly Hootch lawsuit changed education in rural Alaska by arguing that students be able to attend high school in their home villages. Those interviewed include: Molly Hootch of Emmonak; Marshall Lind, commissioner of the Alaska Department of Education; Don Smith, Anchorage assemblyman; Alfred Karmun of Deering; Katherine Mills and Ida Kadashan of Hoonah; unidentified Mt. Edgecumbe High School students; George White, superintendent of the Northwest Arctic School District; unidentified schoolchild; Calvin Moto of Deering; Dr. Judith Kleinfeld of Fairbanks, with the University of Alaska; Dr. Ray Barnhardt of Fairbanks, with the University of Alaska; Marty Zelonky, assistant administrator of the Northwest Arctic School District; Katherine McNamara of McGrath, educator; Enoch Adams of Kivalina, member of the School Board Advisory Committee; Calvin Baker, principal of the Kivalina School; Lowell Sage, Jr., student; and David Watkins, teacher. The program contains views of Emmonak, Kodiak, Mt. Edgecumbe High School in Sitka, Deering High School, the Kivalina School, and drawings and photos and films of early village life and schools in Alaska. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about electrical safety and pneumonia.
Alaska Review 37
Alaska Review 37
Reporter Mark O. Badger explores questions concerning the closure of the Kivalina School due to discipline problems and harassment of the principal and teachers there. Community members express their frustrations and anger with the school administration, and administrators give their points of view. Those interviewed include: George White, superintendent of the Northwest Arctic School District; Enoch Adams of Kivalina, member of the School Board Advisory Committee; Calvin Baker, principal of Kivalina School; Lowell Sage, Jr., student; David Watkins, teacher; Lowell Sage, Sr., student's father; Lena Sage, student's mother; Lucy Adams of Kivalina, former member of the School Board Advisory Committee; Marty Zelonky, assistant administrator of the Northwest Arctic School District; Raymond Hawley, mayor of Kivalina; June Nelson of the Northwest Arctic School Board; and Marshall Lind, commissioner of the Alaska Department of Education. The program contains views of Kivalina, Point Hope, and a class of Point Hope fifth graders. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about energy conservation, chainsaw safety, CARE, forest fire prevention, and seat belt safety.