Alaska Film Archives

[1947 Nalukataq whale feast at Barrow]
[1947 Nalukataq whale feast at Barrow]
Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: “Barrow, Nulakatuk, 1947. After a successful whaling season they have a Nulakatuk celebration which is to celebrate the parting of the whales soul so there is no hard feeling to the whales so they will come again the next year. All the whaling captains get together and have this celebration and if there are a lot of whales killed that season they may have two or three celebrations on different days.", From the Alaska Film Archives, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks., From the William W. Bacon III collection. APR Collection Number 2015-203., AAF-20,079 transferred in 2016 by Reflex Technologies of Burbank, California, to Blu-ray Disc, DVD, and Mac-format external hard drive. Some light and color corrections may have been applied to Blu-ray disc and DVD by Reflex Technologies., Filmmaker's original labeling scheme has film AAF-20,079 numbered as Bacon 17, and titled “1947 Nulakatuk Whale Feast, Barrow.” Film contains scenes of whale and muktuk being distributed at the Nalukataq whale feast at Barrow, people eating and celebrating, blanket toss, men in military uniforms, Alaska Native dancers and drummers, children running and chasing after large vehicle, and more blanket toss.
[1949 Fairbanks flood, mining activities]
[1949 Fairbanks flood, mining activities]
Film contains footage of the Ladd Field Post Cafeteria sign, a man and a woman walking together, a man welding, large machinery, boats on the Chena River, flooded areas in downtown Fairbanks, 1st Avenue Dress Shoppe, swimming pool, Wells Alaska Motors, flooding in a neighborhood, flooding around houses, flooding in the woods, men in a boat, men walking through flood waters, boating in flood waters, Northern Commercial Company power plant with a sternwheeler riverboat parked along bank, Samson Hardware and Mining Machinery, a sunrise in the woods, large pieces of mining equipment, a dredge, men working with hydraulic giants, men working a sluicebox, people around a campfire, people in the woods camping, large mining machinery, farmland (potatoes?), a large dredge bucket, a dragline, two men in a little yellow raft on the water, men walking on the Davidson Ditch pipe, Discovery Claim Felix Pedro sign, people gold panning, a group shot of people showing off goldpans with gold and gold nuggets in them, the landscape surrounding the mining area, KFAR building and tower, the Rapids Meals and Rooms building, Rapids Hunting Lodge (Black Rapids Roadhouse), a group of men on and around a truck, and a large building on fire.
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme has film AAF-20,005 numbered as Bacon 1-01 and titled "Eskimo carver with old bold [bow] drill: WP [workprint]-100 feet." AAF-20,005 has not yet been digitized - it is the workprint for AAF-20,006, which the filmmaker's original labeling scheme has numbered as Bacon 1-02 and titled, "1988 ivory carver with drill in mouth: ECN [Eastman Color Negative]-100 feet." Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 1 - 3 Small Reels, 1 Large Reel - Kotzebue, Nome, Original reels and Work Prints. BIMA is a floating dredge. Huge dredge was digging up gold bearing sand off Nome. Also other shots of Nome on same reel, ivory carver Pat, close up of head shots of dogs, dog team packed with dogs, tourists panning for gold and riding dog sleds, breakwater, tug and barge coming into channel, Front Street of Nome, ivory shop cut in to ivory carver, downtown Nome, the Nugget Inn on Front Street of Nome, Dredge 5 working." [Note that this description does not entirely match actual footage on reels - it is likely that portions of this description were meant for AAF-20,084].
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
[1988 ivory carver; BIMA dredge at Nome]
The filmmaker's original labeling scheme has film AAF-20,008 numbered as Bacon 1-04 and titled "BIMA dredge: ECN,ECL-1,200 feet." Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 1 - 3 Small Reels, 1 Large Reel - Kotzebue, Nome, Original reels and Work Prints. BIMA is a floating dredge. Huge dredge was digging up gold bearing sand off Nome. Also other shots of Nome on same reel, ivory carver Pat, close up of head shots of dogs, dog team packed with dogs, tourists panning for gold and riding dog sleds, breakwater, tug and barge coming into channel, Front Street of Nome, ivory shop cut in to ivory carver, downtown Nome, the Nugget Inn on Front Street of Nome, Dredge 5 working." [Note that this description does not entirely match actual footage on reels - it is likely that portions of this description were meant for AAF-20,084].
[Alaska '35]
[Alaska '35]
This film contains footage of Alaska Railroad cars, horses pulling a wagon on a bridge, mountains and glaciers, mountain goats on a hillside, men with a boat on a beach, a street and buildings in Seward, a steam engine and train arriving at Palmer or Matanuska Junction, Matanuska Valley Colony and colonists, farm buildings and farm workers, a hog with piglets, men with pitchforks scooping hay, people in a truck moving furniture, a man and child at a water pump, a hay wagon, barns and silos, people building frame houses, a blacksmith or machinist at work, men moving building supplies with trucks and bulldozers, a family posing next to a finished house, workers and machinery threshing grain or chopping hay, a farmstead with a log home, a Caterpillar crossing railroad tracks, men unloading bags from a truck, people offloading supplies from a train, a bulldozer pulling a load of construction material, several Caterpillars clearing land and grading soil, a train and steam engine, trucks near tents, people with horses, a blacksmith, children in a wagon, the trading post and cooperative store, a family and home, a girl on a ladder, workers finishing house construction, people moving items into a house, a man chopping a tree, a man and boy at a water pump, men pitching hay, a frame home, a log home, a barn and silo, a horse and wagon, a threshing machine, a farm in the distance, and a car on the road.
Alaska 49th state : [part 1]
Alaska 49th state : [part 1]
This film was used for lectures by the Machetanzes when they travelled outside of Alaska. Footage includes the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner headline "Alaska 49th State," George Sundborg checking teletype and noting the passage of statehood legislation on June 30 1958, statehood headlines from the Anchorage Daily Times and Anchorage Daily News, men launching a large star suspended by helium balloons from the Polaris building's roof in Fairbanks, a line of people signing a giant telegram in Fairbanks, a statehood parade down Second Avenue in Fairbanks, Ernest Gruening shaking hands in Anchorage, and graphics showing routes to Alaska. Additional images include passengers embarking on the Riverboat Discovery near Fairbanks, Jim Binkley piloting the boat and talking on a microphone, Mary Binkley with a microphone and an unidentified assistant showing fur to passengers, Alaska Natives at Tanana River fish camp, Alaska Native men building a fishwheel, men retrieving salmon from a fishwheel and processing it for drying, an Alaska Native woman making a birch bark basket, Sara Machetanz looking at a birch bark baby carrier, and Sara with baby Traeger Machetanz. Additional images include children bottle feeding a moose calf, people harvesting grain and vegetables in the Matanuska Valley, an aerial view of an oil drill rig, Healy coal mine, men operating a hydraulic giant and driving thaw points near Fairbanks, a dredge operating near Fairbanks, men using Caterpillars and a dragline to operate a large sluice box, sluice box clean-up, and a man smelting gold into an ingot. Additional images include the Machetanzes Hi Ridge cabin near Palmer during winter, Fred using a dog team and chainsaw to obtain firewood, a moose at a cabin, Fred and Sara travelnig to Palmer during winter, a snow plow and rotary snowblower on the road, and Jan Koslosky with a rifle showing a large Polar Bear hide. Images at the Fur Rendezvous in Anchorage include a fur auction, a weight-pull contest, a blanket toss, a merry-go-round, the start line of World Champion Dog Sled Races, and Northern Alaska Native dancers performing the Wolf Dance.
Alaska 49th state : [part 2]
Alaska 49th state : [part 2]
This film was used for lectures by the Machetanzes when they travelled outside Alaska. Footage includes Open North American dog sled races in Fairbanks and Dr. Roland Lombard wearing bib number one. Additional images include travel on the Alaska Railroad during winter, a man with a reindeer in Fairbanks, downtown Fairbanks, a party at the Atwood home in Anchorage, international travelers arriving at the Anchorage International Airport and Bob Reeve at the airport, a musical conductor and choral group, KTVA television studios and Norma Goodman, and shoppers in a grocery store. Southeast Alaska images include glaciers and travel by ship, amphibious aircraft taking off in Juneau, loggers cutting and hauling trees, Ketchikan Pulp Mill, salmon in a stream, purse seiner and cannery. Additional images include two men going upstream in a canoe and fishing for grayling, and campus buildings at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.
[Alaska Air Guard earthquake film]
[Alaska Air Guard earthquake film]
This film contains scenes of earthquake damage in Anchorage, Kodiak, Seward, and Valdez following the March 27, 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. Title screens indicate the footage was shot by an Alaska Air National Guard Air Transport Squadron.
[Alaska Airlines Lockheed Starliner aircraft]
[Alaska Airlines Lockheed Starliner aircraft]
The donor’s original number and title for AAF-20723 are: “RM 16. Alaska Airlines, Connie OTZ, Cooper Ldg, Sheep.” This film features an Alaska Airlines Lockheed Starliner with "Fly Alaska" on its side (N7316C) landing and taxiing on a snowy runway at Kotzebue in northwest Alaska, an Alaska Airlines ramp agent directing the aircraft on the ground, passengers walking toward and boarding the airplane, and views of sheep on a hill. Note that the Starliner developed out of the Lockheed Super Constellation with the Starliner having a redesigned wing and more powerful engines.
Alaska Division: Great Falls to Fairbanks
Alaska Division: Great Falls to Fairbanks
This is an Army Air Corps training film for crews ferrying aircraft from Great Falls, Montana to Fairbanks, Alaska, where Soviet pilots then took possession of the airplanes. The aircraft were part of the Lend-Lease program in which the United States sent war supplies to the Soviet Union during World War II. Footage includes graphics showing the route, aerial views of runways along the route, views of runways during landings, and graphics advising pilots of procedures for aborting flights. During the life of the Lend-Lease project, nearly 8,000 planes flew along this route, also known as the Alaska-Siberia (ALSIB) route, from Montana to Alaska then on to Krasnoyarsk in Siberia. The film was made by the U.S. Army Air Forces Air Transport Command Overseas Technical Unit.
[Alaska Highway travel, winter carnival, mining]
[Alaska Highway travel, winter carnival, mining]
This film contains footage of scenic outdoor views (possibly along the Alcan Highway), dog mushing, St. Joseph's Hospital and the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in downtown Fairbanks, The Cushman Street Bridge, buildings along the shore including the Pioneer Hotel and Northern Commercial Company power plant, scenes from a Fairbanks winter carnival including a blanket toss, people ice skating and playing hockey in outdoor rink, vehicles, a parade and crowds of people, footage of mining operations with a heavy piece of machinery, a man unloading wood near downtown Fairbanks, men standing in a field, airplanes parked on the ground, two men and a dog standing in snow, a small airplane taxiing in the snow, cars in front of a hardware store, a man standing in front of a house, a man and woman standing on a stone bridge (not in Alaska), mountain views (likely not Alaska), a man in a field with grapes, a woman tending a rose bush, a car in front of a house, scenic landscape views, a sunset through snowy woods, the Northward Building in downtown Fairbanks, a cabin in snowy woods, and a group of people at an indoor gathering.
[Alaska Native celebrations]
[Alaska Native celebrations]
This film contains scenes of different groups of Alaska Native peoples drumming and dancing in Southeast and Northern Alaska, people sharing and eating muktuk (whale) at a celebration in Northern Alaska, and a blanket toss in Northern Alaska (possibly Barrow).
Alaska Review 03
Alaska Review 03
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. The first segment deals with small airplane safety issues in Alaska. Issues include the increased number of airplane crashes, safety concerns, pilot training, weather conditions and preparedness, and FAA regulations. Those interviewed include: pilot Jerry Olson; head of the Alaska office of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Frank Malone; owner of Webber Air Service in Ketchikan Jack Swaim (misidentified in title screen); pilot Wes Lynch in Kivalina; air service owner Paul Haggland of Fairbanks; Alaska Governor and pilot Jay Hammond of Naknek and Juneau; Alaska Regional Director of the FAA Lyle Brown; and the unidentified witness of a small plane crash. The second segment examines oil tanker safety in Alaskan waters, including Prince William Sound. Footage includes the breakup and sinking of the oil tanker Argo Merchant in 1976, the Port of Long Beach in California, N.A.S.C.O shipyards in San Diego, Puget Sound in Washington, and the Port of Valdez and Valdez Narrows in Alaska. Issues discussed include oil tanker construction, navigation challenges at the Port of Valdez, and ways to minimize oil spill risks. Those interviewed include: Chuck Champion, Alaska's Pipeline Coordinator; Walt Parker, leader of the Alaska Governor's task force on tankers; Captain Roletti of the oil tanker Sea Tiger; Admiral Hayes, head of the Alaska Command of the U.S. Coast Guard; Dave Stevens, State of Washington tanker expert; Alaska State Senator Chancy Croft; Ernst Mueller, commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation; A.B. Mookhoek, head of Exxon's Marine Oceans Operations and chairman of the Marine Subcommittee of Alyeska; Bill Morrice, Valdez Port Director; Captain Bill Fiskin, in charge of vessel loading; and Dr. Betty Willard of the President's Council on Environmental Quality. The third segment, reported by Janet Archibald, covers the struggle to keep the Anchorage Daily News in business. Those interviewed include: Kay Fanning, publisher of the Anchorage Daily News; Hugh Fleisher, co-chairman of the Committee for Two Newspapers; Robert Atwood, publisher of the Anchorage Daily Times; and Lee Jordan, publisher of the Chugiak-Eagle River Star. Program includes public service announcements (PSAs) about the Council on Aging, child abuse, and human development.
Alaska Review 04
Alaska Review 04
Hosts Ed Bennett and Eric Eckholm introduce the program. In the first segment, Alaska Review correspondent Janet Archibald examines the future of the military in Alaska. Interviewees include: General James Boatner of the U.S. Army; Captain Richard Frase of the U.S. Army; Sergeant Jonny Ray of the U.S. Army; Major Dave Moss of the U.S. Army; Colonel George Robertson of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; and Richard Eakins, director of the Alaska Division of Economic Enterprise.Footage features wintertime Jack Frost training exercises at Ft. Greely, the Bolio Lake Test Site, Eielson Air Force Base, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Fort Richardson, Fort Wainwright, and U.S. Coast Guard vessels at Juneau. In the second segment, the conflict between the Teamsters Union in Alaska and the Prinz Brau Brewery in Anchorage is investigated. Ed Bennett interviews: Peter Bading, brewery developer and founder of Prinz Brau Brewery in Alaska; Tom Kelly, former Alaska Commissioner of Natural Resources; Gerhardt Konitzky, Prinz Brau brewery manager; Heinrich Reich, brewmaster for Prinz Brau Brewery; Mike Gordon, owner of Chilkoot Charlie's in Anchorage; and Larry Wooten, owner of Party-Time Liquors. Many others involved in Alaska's alcohol industry are mentioned or quoted. Images include brewing and bottling facilities at Prinz Brau Brewery, Alaska liquor stores, and the Teamsters Mall and Hospital. [Note: Ed Bennett calls Prinz Brau the first brewery in the state. He corrects himself on Alaska Review #5. Prinz Brau is the first producing brewery in Anchorage.]. The third segment explores the ways in which lobbyists and lobbying influence Alaska lawmaking. Eric Eckholm interviews: Alaska State Senators Bill Ray, Pat Rodey, and Clem Tillion; Alaska State Representative Bob Bradley; lobbyists Waco Shelly representing Mobil Oil, J.B. Hanford representing Odom, Tim Bradner representing BP-Alaska, Lewis Dischner representing Teamsters Local 959 and other entities, and Bill Overstreet representing Alaska School Boards; former Alaska State Representative Bill Parker; and Herb Montoya, chairman of the Alaska Public Offices Commission (APOC). Program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcoholism, gas mileage stickers on new cars, and services available for disabled children.
[Alaska travel]
[Alaska travel]
This film contains scenes of mountains, the AJ Mine in Juneau, the state capitol building in Juneau, boat travel along the Inside Passage, a large steamship with three smokestacks or funnels, aerial views of glaciers and mountains, the Mendenhall Glacier, signs for White Pass and the Trail of ’98, Miles Canyon on the Yukon River near Whitehorse in Canada, Robert Service Camp, a brief glimpse of the sternwheeler S.S. Tutshi, men waving in front of a Lockheed Electric airplane (NC14906), aerial views of landscapes, aerial views of Fairbanks and landing at Weeks Field, the Old Main building at the University of Alaska campus in Fairbanks, a car driving on railroad tracks, a sign for the golden spike along the Alaska Railroad near Nenana, Alaska Railroad Engine No. 1 on display, a White Pass and Yukon Route train, the entrance to Mt. McKinley National Park, a red tour bus in the park, black and white scenes of Alaska wildlife, a large placer mining operation with a dredge, a log cabin, men at work using hydraulic giants and steam points, a gold mining operation near the ocean, totem poles at Stanley Park in Vancouver in Canada, Alaska Native people and homes in Nome, fishermen unloading halibut from a boat (possibly at Prince Rupert in Canada according to Stevens's notes - he adds that the halibut heads were cut off and used for fertilizer), adults and children playing shuffleboard on a ship deck, a man playing accordion aboard the ship, and aerial views of landscapes including rivers and mountains.
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 1]
[Alaska travel, Healy, Valdez, Gulkana, Ski Boot Hill, travel outside 1]
This film is made up of several smaller reels labeled: "Raft Race and Rodeo," "August 1967, Mom and Dad Arriving, Valdez Trip, Floods, [?] House," "Raft Race," "Raft Race," "Wisc Kids 1966," "Wisc Kids #2," "Ferry to Whittier 1972," and "Square Dance 1973." The film contains footage of a raft race on the Tanana River near Fairbanks, a rodeo, Wien airplanes at an airport, Valdez area waterfalls, a man and boy holding fish and standing near a camper, flooded homes in a neighborhood, North Star Borough School buses, family scenes outside Alaska, scenes viewed from the deck of a ferry, and people square-dancing.
Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3
Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3
Images include the title screen "Educational Films Corporation America Presents Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3 Produced by Al.I.Smith." This film's scenes feature early Anchorage, Alaska Railroad construction, Childs Glacier calving, and men hunting Kodiak bears. It also includes scenes of Anchorage streets and log structures, the Alaska Labor Union building, a laundry tent, Fourth of July celebrations featuring an eating contest, a baseball game, and Anchorage area bungalows.
[Alyeska start-up]
[Alyeska start-up]
Images include the press and TV crews at Prudhoe Bay waiting for oil to start flowing into the Trans-Alaska Pipeline on June 20, 1977 as well as scenes inside a control room and aerial views of Prudhoe Bay facilities. See AAF-20,001 -- AAF-20,002 for associated items. Reed Bovee interviewed filmmaker Bill Bacon in 2010, and the following information about these films is based on Bovee's notes from that interview: "Box 108 - 1 large reel, 2 medium reels, 1 photo and a magazine article - Start-up at pig launcher. This is the first time they put oil in the pipeline. They put a pig in the pipe first and in it was an electronic device that could detect where the oil was. You could walk along and hear the pig pinging, and they had instruments that could pick it up to track it when it went underground. Bill was the only one allowed inside the pump station because he worked for Alyeska. There were TV crews from all over the world to film this and he was the only one allowed in. Bill was in there filming, and the oil started to come into the pump station, and all of the sudden oil started coming in and spraying all over the station. This guy that worked in there yelled at Bill, 'Does that camera run on electricity?' And Bill answered, 'Yes sir.' He yelled back, 'Shut it off,' so Bill did and he said, 'What the hell is the matter?' The guy said, 'One spark and this whole place blows to kingdom come - you don’t realize but that crude oil has everything in it - it has gas and everything in it, so it will blow this thing to hell.' Once they cleaned it up a little, they let him film again, and he got film of them cleaning it up. The man in the pump station said, 'Mark my words before this oil gets to Valdez someone is going to get killed,' and sure enough someone did. There was a leak in the pipe, and they did not shut off all the electrical stuff, and the thing blew up. No one knows why, but it happened."
An American Senator
An American Senator
Contains footage from Senator Ernest Gruening's visit to Turkey. Original notes accompanying film contain the following scene descriptions: "1) Senator is met by Deputy Governor at Eskisehir Border. 2) Senator enters the Province Building. 3) Senator meets the Governor of Eskisehir and talks with him. 4) Departure from the Province Building. 5) Senator receives information on the statue in front of the Province Building. 6) Senator visits the Air Forces Commandership in Eskisehir. 7) Senator visits the Turkish Railway shops in Eskisehir. 8) Senator meets the students at the Eskisehir shops. 9) Senator rides on Devrim Car (first Turkish manufactured car). 10) Senator visits Eskisehir Forest Nursery. 11) Senator visits Iron Industrialists Association in Eskisehir. 12) Senator lunches at Liman Restaurant in Istanbul. 13) Senator, his wife and AID Deputy Director. 14) AID Deputy Director's speech. 15) Senator delivers a speech. 16) Director of Education delivers a speech. 17) The guests listen [to] the speeches. 18) Turkish teachers who participated in course in the United States receive certificates. 19) Senator visits the warehouses constructed by US AID."
[Anchorage, Seward, Hooper Bay, glaciers and skiing]
[Anchorage, Seward, Hooper Bay, glaciers and skiing]
AAF-11873 is made up of ten smaller reels that have been combined. Reel 1 is labeled “Turnagain School” and contains exterior views of the Turnagain School building (during the mid-1950s or 1970s?). Reel 2 is labeled “1954 Downtown NCG and Lib and [GA?] Hill School etc., airplane in [inlet?].” It contains views of Anchorage area buildings and an airplane in the water. Reel 3 is labeled “Misc. Anchorage signs” and contains views of signs (circa 1970s?). Reel 4 is labeled “Train to Seward thru loop” and contains views of a train and from a train (circa 1950s?). Reel 5 is labeled “Hooper Bay” and contains exterior views of a building and people exiting the building (circa mid 1970s?). Reel 6 is labeled “Columbia Glacier by Air 50s” and contains scenes of glaciers (circa 1950s?). Reel 7 is labeled “Flying” and contains aerial views of water (circa?). Reel 8 is labeled “Flying looks like King Salmon?” and contains aerial scenes of water (circa late 1950 or 1970s?). Reel 9 is labeled “[Global?] cup at Alyeska” and contains scenes of skiers in a competition (circa late 1950s or 1970s?). Reel 10 is labeled “Nat’l Ski Racer” and contains views of skiers with bib numbers – original film was processed in April 1963. Notes from the nephew of Wally Wellenstein in 2015: “Please remember that Uncle Wally put together several small spools of film to make the reels. We think that Wally was trying to tell a story for his family back in Minnesota, rather than relate in chronological order his adventures. Some of the scenes are out of order, date wise. The bulk of his movies were of his adventures in Alaska. He also spent time recording the life of his sister Joan’s family."
[Art class]
[Art class]
Film contains scenes of a classroom full of artists sketching and painting as a male model sits in a chair at the front of the classroom. Fred Machetanz sketches and paints, and he instructs other artists at their easels or as they look over his shoulder. Fred Machetanz looks at and talks about a display of sketches, swatches and paintings with labels such as “1935 Alaska Unalakleet” and “Materials, Pigments, Glazing,” etc.
[Baby eating muktuk]
[Baby eating muktuk]
This film contains footage of the Benson family, children playing outside in summer, and a baby in a high chair eating muktuk.
[Bird dogs, parade, earthquake damage, winter scenery, coastal views]
[Bird dogs, parade, earthquake damage, winter scenery, coastal views]
This reel is made from three smaller reels of film. The original cans are labeled: “Retrieve[?]; Log house[?]; earthquake, Fraiser Canyon, ferry, Alcan.” Footage includes dogs receiving retrieval training and perhaps being judged at a competition, the 1962 Golden Days Parade in Fairbanks, bridge construction at an unknown location, Astoria Column in Astoria Oregon, a Sitka spruce sign on the end of a large log, a large log building and a train display, waves along a beach, a sign for the end of the Lewis and Clark trail, waterfowl, a steam engine train display and other equipment at a museum, Anchorage buildings and homes showing severe damage from the 1964 earthquake, a sign that says "I knew it was tough to make a living in Alaska but I didn't think we'd go 'in the hole' this bad!,” mountains in winter, a car with a flat tire on an icy road, a tire being changed, a man dip netting for small fish, a coastal town and harbor, and scenes from aboard ferry.
[Caribou herds and Alaska Native village]
[Caribou herds and Alaska Native village]
This film contains a variety of scenes of a large herd of caribou in the wild, Denali (Mt. McKinley), snowy scenes in an Alaska Native village in northern Alaska, a polar bear hide being offloaded from an airplane, a woman and a children posing for the camera, two boys demonstrating traditional Alaska Native dance, a woman hugging a small baby, a woman with a large fur ruff on her parka hood, a man and woman wearing parkas, boys demonstrating Alaska Native dance, aerial views of a reindeer or caribou herd, dog sleds approaching a herd, and men butchering a reindeer or caribou on the tundra.
[Chalkyitsik films - part 1 of 2]
[Chalkyitsik films - part 1 of 2]
These notes are from Jennifer Jolis of Fairbanks and UAF Prof. Stanley Edwin of Fort Yukon, who viewed this film in the Alaska Film Archives offices at the Rasmuson Library, UAF, on November 21, 2017. Jolis was a VISTA volunteer and Edwin was a 6-year-old growing up in Chalkyitsik, Alaska, during 1966-1967, when Jolis and others shot these films. AAF-13933 begins with images taken in January 1967 by Jolis’ father (Bernard Jolis) and sister (Gillian Jolis), who visited Chalkyitsik; father and sister snowshoe in front of Isaac and Sally Henry’s cabin; Bill Fredson on snowshoes; snowmachine; muskrat trapping; mushing; scenes from Wien or Wright Airlines flight from Fairbanks to Fort Yukon to Chalkyitsik; first snowmachine in town belonged to Edison Peter; Jolis’ house belonged to the Episcopal Church; group of cabins includes homes of Mimi and William Salmon, Ben and Julia Thomas, Mary Thompson, Belle Herbert, Charlie and Sharon Thomas, Paul Thomas, and the Community Hall; caches belong to the Salmon Family; Jolis’ father and sister, and Bill Fredson; owl on pole erected for radio reception; two unidentified children; breakup of the Draanjik or Black River; Stanley Edwin as a child; Eagle-the-dog who was originally from the town of Eagle; Community Hall; Johnny Edwin standing to left of dog; Spring Carnival; Sam Herbert; teacher Marianne Nicholson in red coat; Simon Francis Jr. in center; Johnny Edwin standing to left of person wearing bib #5; Sam Herbert standing in center under banner; Ladies’ snowshoe race during Spring Carnival; Sam Herbert in parka on left; Bill Fredson in group; elders Henry and Sarah Williams on left; David Salmon’s wife in red skirt; Patty Salmon in white coat and checked scarf, on right; Woody Salmon standing next to Patty Salmon; Patty Salmon’s face; Abraham Henry behind sled with parka; Johnny Edwin; Sam Herbert in overalls; moose in boat; hunting scenes were maybe filmed by Bill Fredson in fall 1966; Sam Herbert in bow of boat; and also in boat are Paul Herbert, Johnny Edwin, and Woody Salmon.
[Chalkyitsik films - part 2 of 2]
[Chalkyitsik films - part 2 of 2]
These notes are from Jennifer Jolis of Fairbanks and UAF Prof. Stanley Edwin of Fort Yukon, who viewed this film in the Alaska Film Archives offices at the Rasmuson Library, UAF, on November 21, 2017. Jolis was a VISTA volunteer and Edwin was a 6-year-old growing up in Chalkyitsik, Alaska, during 1966-1967, when Jolis and others shot these films. AAF-13934 contains scenes of Eagle-the-dog; slough where fall fishing and ice fishing happened; Bobby Moses as a boy; Alice and Carl Moses cutting moose; Marianne Nicholson; Patty Salmon in canvas-covered canoe; summer of 1966 scenes; cabins with poles sticking up for radio reception; cabins; greenhouse and the old school, which was replaced in 1967 because of flooding; Bob Mott’s barge; Fort Yukon boat; Bill Fredson changing stovepipe; children playing on oil barrels include Stanley Edwin, Darryl Salmon, Robert Moses, Paul Edwin, and Agnes Herbert (wearing a scarf); unknown boy on swing; girl on swing is Isabelle Salmon wearing red; Bill Fredson with hand over face; scenes from flying over Chalkyitsik – possibly in Wien airplane – when Jolis was first arriving in 1966; fall time of year; Red Bluff, so called because of the reddish color of the soil; Johnny Edwin and possibly Woody Salmon in plaid shirt (maybe Paul Herbert shot this portion of the film); and Bill Fredson at lake.
[Chatanika, narrow-gauge, Gilmore]
[Chatanika, narrow-gauge, Gilmore]
AAF-784 images include F.E. gold camp at unidentified location, Jess Bryant with glasses, hat and cigar, Joseph Romig in dark suit with cigar, Davidson Ditch, Chatanika River, Chatanika siphon, Ella Romig next to pipe, hydraulic giants, Dredge Number 6 under construction at Gilmore, Alaska Railroad narrow-gauge train on original track from the Tanana Valley Railroad at Chatanika, unidentified people, and completed dredge at work.
[Chuck Gray film collection]
[Chuck Gray film collection]
This film includes footage of Seward, aerial views of Seward, and Anchorage following the 1964 Good Friday Earthquake. Additional footage includes Alaska Dog Mushers dogsled races at the Fairbanks track on Farmers Loop Road, dogsled races with Le Mans style start, dogsled slalom race, a snowshoe softball game, the 1966 Golden Days Parade including Charlie Creamer driving a car and George Clayton with his old truck. Final images feature people on rides at the Golden Days Midway.
[Church collection glacier and yacht]
[Church collection glacier and yacht]
Film contains views of a glacier in south or southeastern Alaska, the yacht "Westward," and barges.
[Dawson, 1964 Good Friday earthquake aftermath, Kodiak]
[Dawson, 1964 Good Friday earthquake aftermath, Kodiak]
Footage contains images taken during a trip to Dawson City in Yukon Territory, a Texaco station in Anchorage, people loading of camper, travel along Glenn Highway, highway signs, map showing the route to Dawson City, litter, a woman and a dog, signs at Gakona, signs and buildings at Tok, Forty Mile Roadhouse, Taylor Highway road sign, scenery along Taylor Highway, the Alaska - Canada border, buildings and old mining equipment in Dawson, a woman with a rocker box, a Klondike River bridge, and a sternwheeler deck. Images filmed in Anchorage and along the Seward Highway following the 1964 Good Friday Earthquake include damaged buildings in downtown, damaged houses in Turnagain, a Caterpillar clearing snow, policemen nearing a truck, a business block with buildings below street level, downtown traffic, a loader working on a street, a collapsed airport tower, a funny sign on building, a power line repair crew, law offices, West High School damage, trailers with relief offices, workers replacing bricks, fire trucks, a snow avalanche along Seward Highway, and a power shovel loading rail cars. Images at Kodiak from 1964 include filmmaker Victor Rovier talking with a man on horseback, the waterfront, fishing boats, a petroleum tank farm, a Russian Orthodox Church, downtown buildings, houses, Alaska State Ferry Tustemena arriving, cars being loaded onto a ferry, a motor home being unloaded, a float plane landing and being tied up, aerial views of Kodiak, people at the King Crab Festival, and the dome on a Russian Orthodox Church.