Alaska Film Archives

Alaska Review 42
Alaska Review 42
Alaska Review examines major changes taking place within Alaska's judicial system, such as the elimination of plea bargaining, the discovery of sentencing disparity, revisions in the criminal code, the establishment of an appellate court, and the development of a master plan for correctional institutions in the State of Alaska. Those interviewed include: Art Snowden, administrative director of the Alaska Court System; Mike Rubenstein, former executive director of the Alaska Judicial Council; Nick Maroules, research director for the Alaska Judicial Council; Mary Alice Miller, former 4th Judicial District judge; Barry Stern, assistant attorney general; Larry Weeks, district attorney for Anchorage; Roger Endell of the Criminal Justice Center at the University of Alaska; Charles Campbell, director of the Division of Corrections; Brian Porter, chief of the Anchorage Police Department; Colonel Tom Anderson, director of the Alaska State Troopers; and Avrum Gross, former attorney general of the State of Alaska. The program contains brief views of graduation ceremonies for state troopers, an officer making an arrest, and corrections facilities. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about Alaskan peoples and members of the Protectors of the Land for the Campaign for Human Development and the importance of preserving nature for future scientific discoveries.
Alaska Review 43
Alaska Review 43
Proposed petrochemical development in Alaska is explored in this program. Alaskans examine the Dow Shell Chemical group's proposal for six possible development sites in Alaska, including Fairbanks, Point Mackenzie, Kenai, Seward, Valdez, and Fire Island. Those interviewed include: Pete Lehman, project director for Dow Chemical; Fred Ali of the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation; Ellen Widess of San Francisco, an attorney with California's OSHA Administration; Raphael Moure, a Denver industrial hygienist; Jerry White of Alaska's North Slope Borough; John Carlson, mayor of the Alaska's North Star Borough and member of a citizens advisory board to examine petrochemical development in Alaska; Eric Myers, member of citizens advisory board; Steve Hendrixson, environmental engineer with Shell Chemical Company; Tanya Gularte, member of citizens advisory board; Sharon Macklin, member of citizens advisory board; unidentified petrochemical industry executives; Terry Miller, lieutenant governor of Alaska; Millet Keller, member of citizens advisory board; Ernest Mueller, commissioner of the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation; and Jack Jones, Dow Chemical Community and Government Relations officer. The program includes views of a San Francisco and a Louisiana petrochemical facility as well as excerpts from Dow television commercials. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcoholism and chainsaw safety.
Alaska Review 44
Alaska Review 44
The potential for using air-cushion vehicles for transportation, cargo-hauling, and rescue operations in Alaska is investigated in this episode. Those interviewed include: Captain John McGrath of the Canadian Coast Guard; Captain Spoltman of the U.S. Coast Guard; Dave Westrup, part owner of Hovercraft Transportation Services; Aaron Potz (?), hovercraft operator; Dick Longacre, program manager of a government funded air-cushioned vehicle demonstration program; John Bates, deputy commissioner of the Alaska Department of Transportation; and Pat Ryan of the airport authority in Anchorage. The program contains views of various types of hovercraft in operation over land and water, Prudhoe Bay facilities, a gravel island in the Beaufort Sea, a Bethel-area hovercraft operation, and the Alaska Hovertravel Port in Anchorage. The program ends with a preview of an upcoming Alaska Review episode about the Pribilof Islands. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about real estate title insurance and chainsaw safety.
Alaska Review 45
Alaska Review 45
Alaska Review examines opposing views about Alaska's Subsistence Priority law. Those interviewed include: Walter Charlie of the Copper River/Lake Louise area; Josephine Charles and family of Sheldon Point; Dr. John Kruse of the Institute of Social and Economic Research; Sam McDowell of Alaskans for Equal Hunting and Fishing Rights; Bonnie McCord of the Tyonek Village Council; Don Mitchell of Alaskans For Sensible Fish and Game Management; Chris Goll of the Alaska Board of Fisheries; Jimmy Huntington of the Alaska Board of Fisheries; Dennis Kelso of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Tom Schroeder of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Juanita Melsheimer of English Bay; Bobby Kuasnikoff of English Bay; Marty Freidman of Homer, an attorney representing the Kachemak Bay subsistence group; Louis Gjosund, subsistence fisherman; Judy Theringer and Daniel Breslaw, subsistence fishermen; and others. The program contains views of subsistence hunting and fishing activities at the Bishop Mountain Fish Camp on the Yukon River, the Point Hope whale festival, Barrow, Tyonek, English Bay, and other areas of Alaska. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about alcohol abuse in Alaska and the Independent Quality of Living Center.
Alaska Review 46
Alaska Review 46
Alaska Review examines the innovations of Alaskans who have implemented ways to harness the energy of natural elements such as wind, water, sun, and geothermal resources to provide power in Alaskan communities. Conservation and construction techniques used by individual homeowners as well as municipalities are explored. Those interviewed include: Steve Behnke of Dillingham; Dave Balker (?), manager of Nushugak Electric in Dillingham, Don Markel, projects coordinator of the Division of Energy and Power; Bob Foote of Unalakleet; CJ Phillips (?), president of a corporation interested in developing Pilgrim Springs; Everett Drashner, Cantwell area homesteader; Diane Drashner, Cantwell area homesteader; Joe Marks, owner of a company that developed a wood gasification system; and Bud Root of the Anchorage area. The program contains views of a passively-heated super-insulated home in Dillingham, a waste-heat recovery system used to heat the Dillingham elementary school, wind-powered generators in Unalakleet, hot springs at Pilgrim Springs on the Seward Peninsula, a self-sufficient homestead in Cantwell, a wood gasification system used to create engine fuel from wood, a hydroelectric system, greenhouses, solar panels, and wind turbines.
Alaska Review 47
Alaska Review 47
Alaska Review explores Alaska's waste disposal problems, including concerns about the disposal of hazardous materials at a special waste site near Sterling, the growing population of the Municipality of Anchorage and the rapid filling of the landfill at Merrill Field, and the existence of hazardous wastes left behind by military outposts in Alaska. Members of groups concerned about environmental hazards and the disposal of waste products are interviewed. Those interviewed include: Walt and Elsa Pedersen of Sterling, Alaska; Stan Thompson, mayor of the Kenai Peninsula Borough; Bob Martin, regional manager of the Department of Environmental Conservation in Anchorage; Dave Brown, part owner of Alaska Environmental Industries; Joel Grunwaldt, director of Solid Waste Services for the Municipality of Anchorage; unidentified people-on-the-street interviewees; David Wigglesworth of the Center for the Environment in Anchorage; Steve Kadish, executive director of the Alaska Health Project; Dick Hudson?, manager of Anchorage water treatment facility; and Captain Peter Robles, Jr., of the U.S. Air Force at Elmendorf Air Force Base. The program contains views of the special waste site near Sterling, Alaska, the Union Chemicals Division Kenai Plant facility, Anchorage streets, municipal landfills, public service announcements about recycling and waste disposal, Anchorage water treatment facilities, technicians at work in a water safety testing lab, historic military footage, and military cleanup efforts and facilities.
Alaska Review 48
Alaska Review 48
Mark O. Badger and Edward Coll report on the sealing industry on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs and on recent efforts by the federal government to phase out funding of the seal harvest. Life on the island under Russian and United States rule is examined, and island residents talk about having lived as wards of the federal government and about having been relocated to internment camps in Southeast Alaska during World War II. Managers explain the seal harvest process, and activists talk about their opposition to the harvest. The possible future of the people of St. Paul Island is touched upon. Those interviewed include: Larry Merculief, president of Tanadgusix Corporation; Gabe Stepetin, resident of St. Paul Island; Father Michael Lestenkof, priest on St. Paul Island; Joe Scordino of the National Marine Fisheries Service; Mike Zacharof, supervisor of the By-Products Plant on St. Paul Island; Leslie Dierhauf, veterinarian and voluntary observer of the seal harvest; Captain Paul Watson of Greenpeace; Pamela Wilson, director of the Seal Rescue Fund; and Dr. Charles Fowler of the National Marine Fisheries Service. The program contains views of a St. Paul celebration at the end of sealing season, historical photos and drawings of Aleut peoples, interior and exterior views of the Russian Orthodox Church on St. Paul Island, seal harvest activities and the treatment and packing of seal skins, and scenes from the Wartime Relocation Commission Hearings in Anchorage. The program also contains Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about litter and recycling in Alaska and recycling in general.
Alaska Review 49
Alaska Review 49
Alaska Review covers the debate in Alaska over whether or not nuclear weapons should be used to protect and defend the United States. Topics include the nuclear arms race between the United States and Soviet Union, nuclear arms freeze resolutions put to a vote in three Alaskan cities, Alaska's civil defense plan, evacuation plans, nuclear fallout patterns, and survival plans. Those interviewed include: Steve Williams of Fairbanks, of the Alaskans for the Prevention of Nuclear War; Cindy Marquette of Fairbanks, of the Alaskans for the Prevention of Nuclear War; Don Smith, Anchorage assemblyman; Dave Brook of Anchorage, of the Citizens Concerned about Nuclear War; unidentified people-on-the-street interviewees; Colonel James Grassman, director of operations for the Alaskan Air Command; Jack Cervantes of Wasilla, Southcentral district supervisor for the Alaska Division of Emergency Services; Bruce Staser, director of Civil Defense for the Municipality of Anchorage; John Morris, of Civil Defense for the Municipality of Anchorage; and Linda Duce? of Homer, of the Alaska Institute of Self-Sufficiency and Family Preparedness. The program contains views of historical films and drawings depicting the dropping of nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, gatherings in Alaska to protest the buildup of nuclear weaponry, Elmendorf Air Force Base, maps and depictions of possible damage from nuclear weapons, military bases, hospitals, grocery stores, and equipment and displays at an Alaskan survival fair.
Alaska Review 50
Alaska Review 50
Alaska Review explores the lives of those continuing to pursue a subsistence lifestyle in Alaska despite outside pressures from a quickly changing world and the availability of new tools and methods for hunting and gathering natural resources. The program contains images and interviews that appeared in several earlier Alaska Review programs. Those interviewed include: Arnold Brower, whaling captain; John Evak, subsistence hunter; Juanita Melsheimer of English Bay; Bobby Kuasnikoff of English Bay; Walter Charlie of the Lake Louise area; L. Jolson? of Kachemak City; Judy Theringer and Daniel Breslaw, subsistence fishermen; and Everett and Diane Drashner, homesteaders. The program contains views of Point Hope singers and dancers, a Point Hope whaling celebration, people pulling in fish nets at Bishop Mountain near Galena, scenes at a fish camp, harvesting of fish at English Bay, an Alaskan garden, and a self-sufficient homestead south of Fairbanks.
Alaska Review 51
Alaska Review 51
In the first segment, Eric Eckholm reports on Humpback Whales in Alaska waters and efforts to study and protect the giant mammals. Those interviewed include whale scientist Sharon Guinn and high school biology teacher Charles Juracz of Juneau. Portions of this report are repeated from a segment titled "Whalewatch" that appeared in an earlier Alaska Review program (AAF-4972). A summary of recent findings follows the original report. (Video quality is poor). The second segment, "Fred Machetanz: An Alaskan Master," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4959). The third segment, "The Great Alaskan Iceworm Safari," is a repeat broadcast from another Alaska Review program (AAF-4986).
Alaska Review 52
Alaska Review 52
In the first segment, reporter Eric Eckholm reviews the history of reindeer herding in Alaska and reports on the harvesting of reindeer antlers for sale to foreign markets. Portions of this report are repeated from a segment titled "Reindeer" that appeared in an earlier Alaska Review program (AAF-4961). Updates are given after the original report. Those interviewed include: Mr. Chueng of San Francisco's Chinatown, herbal merchant selling deer antlers for medicinal purposes; Alfred Carmen of Deering, reindeer herder; Dr. Jack Luick of Fairbanks, reindeer scientist; Jim Isabelle, helicopter pilot; Jung Wang, antler buyer; and John Schaeffer, president of NANA Regional Corporation. The report contains views of a helicopter-aided reindeer roundup in Deering, reindeer antler removal, Chinatown in San Francisco, the Teller reindeer round-up, graphics detailing the warble-fly life cycle, and reindeer in winter being inoculated. In the second segment, reporter Eric Eckholm explores the history of sled dog racing and talks to dog mushers about their philosophies on raising sled dogs. Portions of this report are repeated from a segment titled "See How They Run" that appeared in an earlier Alaska Review program (AAF-4957). Updates are given after the original report. Dog mushers Gareth Wright and Roxy Woods are interviewed. Report contains views of sled dog races, dog yards, and the start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Anchorage.
Alaska Review 53
Alaska Review 53
Alaska Review reports on the climbing of Mt. McKinley and regulation changes within Denali National Park and Preserve. Portions of this report are repeated from a segment titled "Denali" that appeared in an earlier Alaska Review program (AAF-4953). Those interviewed in this updated segment include: Jim Hale, mountain guide; Ray Genet, mountain guide; Bob Gerhard, mountaineering ranger for Mt. McKinley National Park; Bradford and Barbara Washburn, explorers and map-makers; Mike Fisher, pilot for Talkeetna Air Service; Nick Hartzell, park ranger; Frances Randall, mountain climber and full time summer resident of glacier landing strip; Glenn Fortner, leader of mountain climbing expedition; Dan Kuehn, Mt. McKinley National Park superintendent; Robert C. Cunningham, Denali National Park and Preserve superintendent; and Gary Bocarde, director of Mountain Trip Guiding Service. The program contains views of park buses, trains, and tourists at Denali National Park, climbing expedition preparations, glaciers, park rangers and maps, and the University of Alaska Center for High Latitude Research Camp.
Alaska Review 54
Alaska Review 54
Alaska Review explores the formation of Alaska's North Slope Borough and the changes brought about by the borough's new and sudden wealth due to Prudhoe Bay oil revenues. The history of the Inupiat and changes brought about to their culture through interaction with Western Society is discussed. Controversies and conflict surrounding the initial formation of the North Slope Borough, the high costs of construction in the arctic, quality of life issues, and allocation of oil revenues are all discussed. Those interviewed include: Eugene Brower, mayor of the North Slope Borough; Jon Buchholdt, North Slope Borough communications consultant and former aide to borough mayor Eben Hopson; State Senator Vic Fisher; Professor John Havelock; Bob Dupere, North Slope Borough financial consultant; Nate Olemaun, mayor of Barrow; unidentified interviewees (names not visible due to poor video quality); Irving Igtanloc, director of capital improvements for the North Slope Borough; Jacob Kagak, mayor of Wainwright; Ethel Patkotak of Wainwright; Maggi Gray of Barrow; and State Senator Rick Halford of Chugiak. The program contains views of North Slope Borough development and construction, Barrow residents and homes, Eben Hopson High School, and the Barrow utilidor system.
Alaska Review 55
Alaska Review 55
Alaska Review examines public health policies in the state of Alaska and their impact and effectiveness in rural areas. Topics include the immunization program, hepatitis B, rural sanitation, and search and rescue operations. Those interviewed include: Dr. John Middaugh, state epidemiologist; Dr. E. S. Rabeau, director of the Division of Public Health; Nancy Davis, regional nursing manager; Dr. Brian McMahan of the Indian Health Service; Bob Kopolka, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Region sanitarian; Ray Hough of the Public Health Service; Paul Kiunya of Kipnuk; David Enock, village president of Tuntutuliak; Elise Serian Patkotak, North Slope Borough health director; Gail Jacoby, Telehealth trainer; Carolyn Simmonds, health aide in Nuiqsut; and Don Gamble, search and rescue pilot and administrator. The program contains views of the Health Clinic in Nightmute, patients and healthcare providers, a medical evacuation flight arriving in Barrow, Providence Hospital in Anchorage, Hepatitis B testing in Tuntutuliak, people receiving vaccination shots, the washeteria in Tuntutuliak, honey bucket disposal sites, a man receiving a dental exam, a demonstration of the Telehealth video system, a search and rescue helicopter, and a search and rescue training mission.
Alaska Review 56
Alaska Review 56
Alaska Review examines sport fishing and commercial fishing on the Kenai River and reports on the conflicts between different user groups. Those interviewed include: unidentified fishermen; Bob Penney, president of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Paul Ruesch, fisheries biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Harry Gaines, sportfishing guide; Bix Bonney of the Alaska Board of Fish; Jim Evenson, president of the United Cook Inlet Drift Association; Jeff Parker of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Doug Blossom, commercial set net fisherman; Lottie Edelman, Kenai fish processor; Dwayne ?, commercial fisherman; Melvin Johnson, commercial set net fisherman; unidentified commercial fisherman; Alaska Governor Bill Sheffield; Tom Wagner, mayor of Kenai; unidentified Kenai resident; Stan Thompson, Kenai Peninsula Borough mayor; Andy Johnson, president of the Salamatof Native Association; Frank Mullen, Soldotna pioneer; and Neil Johannsen, director of Alaska State Parks. The program contains views of the Kenai River, sport fishing activities, commercial fishing operations, fisheries biologists, a meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries, protests by commercial fishermen against sport fishermen, Alaska Governor Bill Sheffield posing with salmon and greeting protestors, and development along the Kenai River. A song titled "Ballad of the Kenai River" by Hobo Jim is featured.
Alaska Review 57
Alaska Review 57
Alaska Review examines development of the agricultural industry in the Matanuska Valley and Delta areas of Alaska, and it reports on financial problems faced by Alaska's farmers. Topics discussed include the 1979 Delta barley project, the Seward grain terminal, the Point Mackenzie dairy industry, Matanuska Maid bankruptcy concerns, and competition from products imported into Alaska. Those interviewed include unidentified farmers; Walter Parker, former commissioner of the Alaska Department of Transportation; Alaska Governor Jay Hammond; Bob Palmer, former state senator and Kenai Peninsula farmer; Alaska State Senator Vic Fisher; Jerry Bremer?, Delta farmer; Charlie Trowbridge?, Delta farmer; Barney Hollembaek, Delta farmer; Bill Heim, director of Alaska's Division of Agriculture; David Smith, assistant manager of Matanuska Maid; Karen Lee of Dairy West at Point Mackenzie; and Pete Probasco, manager of the Alaska Revolving Loan Fund. The program contains views of Matanuska Valley farms, historical photos and films of early farming in Alaska, grocery stores, shipping containers and imported products at sea ports, Delta area farming operations, livestock, dairy cattle, Matanuska Maid milk processing facilities, an ARLF (Agricultural Revolving Loan Fund) board meeting, and egg processing facilities.
Alaska Review 58
Alaska Review 58
Alaska Review examines the rapid growth of Alaska's pollock and bottom-fishing industry and what it means for the state's economy. The report covers topics such as the Magnuson Act, the 200-Mile Limit, joint venture operations, foreign fishing fleets, harvest limits, and new food products such as surimi. Those interviewed include: Thorn (or Thorne?) Tasker of Alaskan Joint Venture Fisheries, Inc.; Al Burch of the Alaska Draggers Association; Chris Riley of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Jim Branson of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council; Greg Baker (?), director of the Office of Commercial Fisheries Development for the State of Alaska; Bob Keating, Joint Venture representative; Colonel Yong Sam Kim of the Samho Moolsan Company of South Korea; Chris Mitchell (?), executive director of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Jerry Babbitt, food scientist with the National Marine Fisheries Service; and Gilbert Francklyn, Dutch Harbor crab fisherman. The program contains views of the Alaska coastline, fishing vessels, the visit of an Alaskan commission to Norway, fish processing facilities, grocery store fish displays, fish preparation at a restaurant, underwater scenes of fish being caught in a bottom trawling net, nets being hauled back aboard boats, graph showing bottom fish harvest levels, scenes from the 1984 North Pacific Fisheries Management Council meeting, a Japanese restaurant, an Alaska Pacific Seafoods processing facility in Kodiak, a food science lab, crab pots and crab boats, and a graph showing a rapid decline in Bering Sea king crab harvest levels.
Alaska Review 60
Alaska Review 60
Alaska Review examines efforts by American fishermen and processors to control and market Alaska's bottom fish. Those interviewed include Jim Branson, executive director of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council; Thorne Tasker of Alaskan Joint Venture Fisheries; David Harville with the Kodiak and Western Trawler Group; Rick Lauber of the Pacific Seafood Processors Association; Chris Mitchell of the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation; Taekuk Chung of Transocean Enterprises of South Korea; and U.S. Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska. The program contains views of commercial fishing activities, foreign and domestic fishing boats and fleets, U.S. Coast Guard vessels, a graph depicting fish harvest levels, and fish processing facilities.
Alaska Review 61
Alaska Review 61
Alaska Review examines problems associated with intensive use of the Kenai River in Alaska and the conflict between commercial and sport fishermen. Topics discussed include loss of salmon habitat, erosion along the river bank, and disturbances caused by boat wakes. Those interviewed include: Paul Ruesch, fisheries biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Bob Penny, chairman of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Bix Bonney, member of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; Jim Evenson, commercial fisherman; Melvin Johnson, commercial fisherman; Stan Thompson, Kenai Peninsula Borough mayor; Harry Gaines, fishing guide; Christopher Estes of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Bill Long, hydrologist with the Alaska Department of Natural Resources; Neil Johannsen, director of Parks for the Alaska Department of Natural Resources; Jeff Jefferson, president of the Kenai River Advisory Board; Sharon Jean (?) of the Kenai River Advisory Board; and Alaska Governor Bill Sheffield. The program includes views of fishermen in small boats and standing on the banks of the Kenai River, people posing with salmon, recreational vehicles along a river, combat fishing, fish traps in use during Alaska's territorial days, fish netting, an annual meeting of the Board of Fisheries, sonar fish counter, biologists tagging salmon, fish processing facilities, protestors, Cook Inlet, and cabins along the river.
Alaska Review 62
Alaska Review 62
Alaska Review examines problems associated with the growth of Alaska's prison population. Topics of discussion include prison overcrowding, the Cleary v. Smith case, treatment programs for sex-offenders, rehabilitation programs for prisoners, presumptive sentencing, and the possible need for more prisons to be constructed. Those interviewed include: Roger Endell, commissioner of the Department of Corrections; State Representative Don Clocksin of Anchorage; Dr. Allan Barnes of the School of Justice at the University of Alaska in Anchorage; Avrum Gross, former State Attorney General; Nick Maroules, research director for the Alaska Judicial Council; Judge Victor Carlson of the Alaska Superior Court in Anchorage; Timothy Sterns (?), attorney who argued on behalf of inmates in the Cleary v. Smith case; Larry Robbins (?), compliance officer at Cook Inlet Corrections Facility in Anchorage; Susan Humphrey Barnett, director of Statewide Programs; State Senator Pat Rodey of Anchorage; State Representative Fritz Pettyjohn of Anchorage; and the Reverend Alonzo Patterson, chairman of the Alaska Parole Board. The program contains views of Alaskan prison facilities, the Lemon Creek Correctional Center, a graph depicting the growth of the statewide inmate population, court proceedings, the Third Avenue Jail in Anchorage, and the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center in Eagle River.
Alaska Review 63
Alaska Review 63
Alaska Review examines the growth and future of Alaska's largest city, Anchorage. The history of the development of the city is discussed, as are present-day problems such as poor transportation corridors and an outdated land-use system. Those interviewed include: Mike Carberry, senior planner for the Municipality of Anchorage; Bob Atwood, publisher of the Anchorage Daily Times; George Sullivan, former mayor of the Municipality of Anchorage; Walt Parker, former member of the Anchorage Assembly; Bill Laria? municipal planning director; Greg Jones, Anchorage planning commissioner; Barry Quinn?, director of capital projects for the Municipality of Anchorage; Tony Knowles, Anchorage mayor; and Scott Hawkins, economist. The program contains many views of historical photos, film clips and maps, and present-day scenes of Anchorage.
An American Senator
An American Senator
Contains footage from Senator Ernest Gruening's visit to Turkey. Original notes accompanying film contain the following scene descriptions: "1) Senator is met by Deputy Governor at Eskisehir Border. 2) Senator enters the Province Building. 3) Senator meets the Governor of Eskisehir and talks with him. 4) Departure from the Province Building. 5) Senator receives information on the statue in front of the Province Building. 6) Senator visits the Air Forces Commandership in Eskisehir. 7) Senator visits the Turkish Railway shops in Eskisehir. 8) Senator meets the students at the Eskisehir shops. 9) Senator rides on Devrim Car (first Turkish manufactured car). 10) Senator visits Eskisehir Forest Nursery. 11) Senator visits Iron Industrialists Association in Eskisehir. 12) Senator lunches at Liman Restaurant in Istanbul. 13) Senator, his wife and AID Deputy Director. 14) AID Deputy Director's speech. 15) Senator delivers a speech. 16) Director of Education delivers a speech. 17) The guests listen [to] the speeches. 18) Turkish teachers who participated in course in the United States receive certificates. 19) Senator visits the warehouses constructed by US AID."
Arctic Haze
Arctic Haze
A documentary about the spread of air pollution into the Arctic from Europe and the Soviet Union. Scientists from around the world work to understand and solve air pollution problems in Alaska and across Northern regions that are caused by industrialization thousands of miles away. Those interviewed include: Matthew Bean of Bethel, Dr. Glenn E. Shaw of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska bush pilot Dennis Miller, Dr. Kenneth A. Rahn of the University of Rhode Island, Dr. Daniel Jaffe of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Dr. Brynjulf Ottar of the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Dr. Tom E. Osterkamp of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Dr. Juan G. Roederer of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, and others. Air pollution, acid rain, ozone depletion, the greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change are all terms that are discussed. The program includes views of tundra regions, research laboratories, and a government observatory for monitoring climatic change located at Barrow.