Alaska Film Archives

Alaska Division: Great Falls to Fairbanks
Alaska Division: Great Falls to Fairbanks
This is an Army Air Corps training film for crews ferrying aircraft from Great Falls, Montana to Fairbanks, Alaska, where Soviet pilots then took possession of the airplanes. The aircraft were part of the Lend-Lease program in which the United States sent war supplies to the Soviet Union during World War II. Footage includes graphics showing the route, aerial views of runways along the route, views of runways during landings, and graphics advising pilots of procedures for aborting flights. During the life of the Lend-Lease project, nearly 8,000 planes flew along this route, also known as the Alaska-Siberia (ALSIB) route, from Montana to Alaska then on to Krasnoyarsk in Siberia. The film was made by the U.S. Army Air Forces Air Transport Command Overseas Technical Unit.
Alaska, The Great Land
Alaska, The Great Land
Footage includes historic photos, a gold dredge, an oil drill rig, a coal mine, a gravel conveyor, Matanuska Valley farms, salmon king crab and halibut fisheries, a pulp mill, Wien aircraft, Native dancers, and scenery. Footage of towns and cities include Wrangell, Petersburg, Ketchikan, Sitka, Juneau, Fairbanks, University of Alaska campus, Point Barrow, Kotzebue, Nome, Prince William Sound, Valdez, Seward, Kenai, and Anchorage. Earthquake footage includes scenes from Anchorage and Seward. Towns shown following the earthquake include Anchorage, Whittier, Valdez, Seward, and Kodiak. During the program, Governor Egan speaks and accounts of the earthquake are told by survivors.
Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3
Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3
Images include the title screen "Educational Films Corporation America Presents Alaska Wonders In Motion No. 3 Produced by Al.I.Smith." This film's scenes feature early Anchorage, Alaska Railroad construction, Childs Glacier calving, and men hunting Kodiak bears. It also includes scenes of Anchorage streets and log structures, the Alaska Labor Union building, a laundry tent, Fourth of July celebrations featuring an eating contest, a baseball game, and Anchorage area bungalows.
Children of Akiachak
Children of Akiachak
This film was produced by the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs, Juneau Area Office, to examine the pilot study of a community child development program in the Alaska village of Akiachak. The bilingual program trained parents to use various methods for teaching their own preschool children. The program emphasized development of language and motor skills in preparation for elementary school.
Gardening is great in the north
Gardening is great in the north
This film contains tips about gardening in the North. It includes scenes of man mushing dogs to a cabin, a man and woman talking about hunting and farming, a woman making a phone call using a rotary phone, Virgil Severns of Cooperative Extension Service, gardening site selection tips, vegetable variety tips, a demonstration of starting seeds in foam cups, people shoveling soil and talking about soil sample kits, a man using a roto-tiller in a small garden area, people discussing fertilizer, a man demonstrating how to prepare potatoes for planting, a demonstration of garden planting techniques, hoeing and weeding, a family harvesting vegetables from their garden, and a demonstration of techniques for storing carrots. The credits are as follows: Photographer and editor, Reginald Emmert of UAF Rasmuson Library Media Services, animation and art by Dolores Hutchison, audio by Kevin Hamel, music by Helen Hansen, production assistance by Kathy Kollodge, special thanks to Claire Fejes and Gary Stein and Virgil Severns, and supported by The Alaska Native Human Resource Development Program. A list of gardening publications appears at the end.
[Howard C. Robinson's Alaska film 2]
[Howard C. Robinson's Alaska film 2]
This film contains scenes of fishing operations at Bristol Bay, sail boats and fishermen of Bristol Bay fishing fleet, cannery barges, a cannery line, sport-fishing, pilot Gren Collins and his airplane on floats, Kenai River, Brooks River, Kokolik River?, Alaska birds and waterfowl, Dall sheep, mountain goats, deer, caribou, buffalo, bears, moose, fur seals in the Pribilof Islands, the fur seal industry, Lake George and Knik Glacier, and emptying of Lake George.
A Letter for Debra Anne
A Letter for Debra Anne
AAF-13990 and AAF-13991 are presented by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs. Both films contain identical scenes with AAF-13990 narrated in English and AAF-13991 narrated in Yupik. The program is about the development of the Primary Eskimo Program (PEP), a bilingual language program introduced in Yupik-speaking Alaska Native communities of southwest Alaska. Opening credits list Area Director Clarence Antioquia, Assistant Area Director Emil Kowalczyk, Federal Program Director William Menojah, Jr., Title 1 Director Willard Walters, Agency Superintendent of Education S. William Benton, and Education Specialist Calvin Lundy. Cinematographer is Frank Johnson. Editor is Guy Bishop. Storyteller is John Haymer. Yupik interpreter is Oscar Alexie. The film is written and directed by Jerry Warner, and it's produced by Jerry Warner and Associates. The program contains scenes in Kwethluk and Akiachak, Alaska, including elementary-aged students learning to speak, read, and write in both Yupik and English. In 2018, Juliana Carlson, originally from Kwethluk, identified the following individuals who appear in the film: Ethel Peter (at 01:42, center girl with red and black shirt); Deborah, Mabel or Mary Constantine (at 02:16); Deborah Ann Michael of Kwethluk (at 5:07); the Kwethluk First Grade class including teacher Lillian Michael McGill, John Andrew, Jr., Paul Jackson, Anastasia Michael, Wassiliie Paul, Juliana Guy, Matthew Dillon, Minnie Nicori, William Nicolai and Olga Nick (at 05:41); Kwethluk First Graders John Andrew, Jr. and Juliana Guy (at 06:16); Lynn Jones (at 07:24); Alice Alexie, Veronica Michael (left), and Daniel Jackson (at 07:58); Samson Mann and Matthew Nicori (at 17:39); Kwethluk BIA first grade teacher Lillian Michael McGill (at 19:22); James Michael, Lillian Michael and Lola Evan (at 22:47); Sophie Owens Lowery (at 23:21); Kwethluk 3rd and 4th Graders (at 23:55); Elena Pasitnal (left), Elena Chimegalrea (center), and Marla Evan (right) (at 24:29); Deborah Michael of Kwethluk (at 26:46); and Wassillie Paul of Kwethluk (at 27:20).
A Letter for Debra Anne
A Letter for Debra Anne
AAF-13990 and AAF-13991 are presented by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs. Both films contain identical scenes with AAF-13990 narrated in English and AAF-13991 narrated in Yupik. The program is about the development of the Primary Eskimo Program (PEP), a bilingual language program introduced in Yupik-speaking Alaska Native communities of southwest Alaska. Opening credits list Area Director Clarence Antioquia, Assistant Area Director Emil Kowalczyk, Federal Program Director William Menojah, Jr., Title 1 Director Willard Walters, Agency Superintendent of Education S. William Benton, and Education Specialist Calvin Lundy. Cinematographer is Frank Johnson. Editor is Guy Bishop. Storyteller is John Haymer. Yupik interpreter is Oscar Alexie. The film is written and directed by Jerry Warner, and it's produced by Jerry Warner and Associates. The program contains scenes in Kwethluk and Akiachak, Alaska, including elementary-aged students learning to speak, read, and write in both Yupik and English. In 2018, Juliana Carlson, originally from Kwethluk, identified the following individuals who appear in the film: Ethel Peter (at 01:42, center girl with red and black shirt); Deborah, Mabel or Mary Constantine (at 02:16); Deborah Ann Michael of Kwethluk (at 5:07); the Kwethluk First Grade class including teacher Lillian Michael McGill, John Andrew, Jr., Paul Jackson, Anastasia Michael, Wassiliie Paul, Juliana Guy, Matthew Dillon, Minnie Nicori, William Nicolai and Olga Nick (at 05:41); Kwethluk First Graders John Andrew, Jr. and Juliana Guy (at 06:16); Lynn Jones (at 07:24); Alice Alexie, Veronica Michael (left), and Daniel Jackson (at 07:58); Samson Mann and Matthew Nicori (at 17:39); Kwethluk BIA first grade teacher Lillian Michael McGill (at 19:22); James Michael, Lillian Michael and Lola Evan (at 22:47); Sophie Owens Lowery (at 23:21); Kwethluk 3rd and 4th Graders (at 23:55); Elena Pasitnal (left), Elena Chimegalrea (center), and Marla Evan (right) (at 24:29); Deborah Michael of Kwethluk (at 26:46); and Wassillie Paul of Kwethluk (at 27:20).
Radar Observations of Sea Ice at Barrow, Alaska
Radar Observations of Sea Ice at Barrow, Alaska
In this film, title screens and diagrams explain how observations of sea ice were performed and how data were interpreted. The University of Alaska Sea Ice Radar System was a 3-CM, X-Band ship’s radar used to sense natural reflecting surfaces on the ice. It was mounted on a tower about 12 meters above sea level and typically operated at a scanning range of three nautical miles, or 5.5 kilometers. Data acquired by the radar system were recorded by a camera which photographed the radar display at 3-minute intervals, and the resulting film could then be shown as a time-lapse motion picture showing sea ice movement. The area under observation was the Chukchi Sea coast just north of Barrow. The time lapse radar images include dates during which observations were made. Conclusions and unusual events are noted in title screens. See also AAF-11495 and AAF-11497, which contain images related to this study.
[Reindeer, Barrow, seal hunt, Nome]
[Reindeer, Barrow, seal hunt, Nome]
This is a compilation of Eskimo activities from several Van Valin films, and it contains some brief scenes that are not present on other films in the series. Footage includes reindeer herding as well as life and activities in Nome. Summary: Footage includes a reindeer round-up, herders examining ear tags, reindeer being butchered, a man's hair being cut (koocheeruk) with a stone knife and wooden board, mail arriving from Kotzebue, snow house construction, dance movements, people going to church during Easter in Barrow, traditional sod houses during winter and summer, a skin tent, a King Eider duck, a man in a kayak, a village dance, boats with sails, seal hunting (patkotak), hauling a seal across an ice pack and pressure ridges, sled dogs hauling a bearded seal up on beach, Eskimos skinning a bearded seal (oogruk), seals being butchered and meat being transported by dog sled, a sled dog eating a dead dog, a midnight sun sequence, supplies hauled in an umiak, a blanket toss, a whaling festival and celebration (nalukutuq). Footage in Nome includes lightering people to shore, beach mining, racing dogs in Nome, Sinuk River, towing an umiak, salmon fishing, pipe smoke, drying salmon, and a kayak frame.
[Time-lapse images of sea ice movement at Barrow 1975 - 1976]
[Time-lapse images of sea ice movement at Barrow 1975 - 1976]
These are time lapse images of sea ice at Barrow, Alaska. See also AAF-11495 and AAF-11496, which contain images and information related to this study. This reel was made up of eight smaller reels of film spliced together onto one reel. Note that four original reels are each followed by duplicate reels. The original boxes are labeled as follows: 1) July 4, 1975 - July 1-4, 1975 - ice came in - feet show effect. 2) July 1-4, 1975 - dup #2 - Barrow ice data. 3) July 4-8, 1975 - Barrow ice data [note that several feet of blank unexposed film was removed from the end of this reel prior to digitizing]. 4) July 4-8, 1975 - Barrow ice data - dup #2 [note that several feet of blank unexposed film was removed from the end of this reel prior to digitizing]. 5) June 24, 1976 - ice moved in [note on film leader had question mark after date as follows: "June 24, 76?"]. 6) June 1976 after 24th June? [note on film leader was as follows: "After June 24, 76 - before Jun 30"]. 7) 1 End June 30, 1976. 8) 1 End June 30, 1976.
[Wilkins expeditions, wonders in motion etc. 2]
[Wilkins expeditions, wonders in motion etc. 2]
This footage features buildings in Anchorage, the wooden trestle at Eagle River, track laying crews, and other construction activities. Childs Glacier near Cordova is also shown.